Welcome to the Company: Ideas for Successful Onboarding

Hiring new employees can be an exciting time – for both you and the new hire! After all, you found an awesome addition to your team, and you’re excited to show them how great your business is. Although having a new hire can be really fun, it can also be really stressful – especially for the new person.

You want to alleviate stress for your new hire by giving them a smooth transition into your business. So, how do you do that? Here are some ideas for giving your new hire a smooth start in your business.

  • Start with the small stuff: When your new hire starts, there are some seemingly small items that can actually help make the transition a little easier for them. Consider a small welcome gift they can use in the office, such as a water bottle or coffee mug. Also, make sure to show them where the bathrooms are, how to use the copy machine and what to do if they’re having computer problems, to name a few. Although these may seem small, these items can help your new hire feel comfortable in the new environment.
  • Use the buddy system: Consider pairing your new hire with an employee who’s been with the company for a while. The buddy can be the new hire’s go to person if they have questions and concerns about getting acclimated within the company. The buddy can also share some of their tips, tricks and experiences, which can ultimately help the new hire get a great understanding of the ins and outs of the business. Having a buddy can also help the new hire feel more comfortable simply because they know someone within the company and are not all alone.
  • Hands-on approach: What better way to learn than by doing? A great way to get your new hire involved and comfortable is to start them off by doing rather than by watching. Whether it be a computer program or making phone calls, involving them from the get-go can provide beneficial training. It also allows the new hire to ask questions in real time as they arise, rather than scrambling for an answer if an issue comes up. However, try not to give them too much hands-on training right away. You want to help them feel comfortable, not overwhelm them.

 

  • Team involvement: Right from the beginning, it’s important to involve the entire team your new hire will work with. Whether it be going out for lunch on the first day or just holding a brief introduction meeting, letting your new hire meet the people he or she will be working with the most gives a level of familiarity which can help lead to better productivity. When the team works well together, better results are often produced.

 

Gaining a new employee is a fun and exciting step for your business. To reduce stress for them (and you), and to give them a smooth transition, consider some of these ideas. When your employees work well together, you can watch your business thrive.

*Bonus: If you need help with new hire onboarding, let us know. Our outsourced HR services can help make sure your new hire has an easy transition.

Our Journey to 100

Have you ever heard of a birth-month rather than a birthday? A few weeks ago, we celebrated our 100th birthday, but we haven’t stopped celebrating.

In fact, we’ve had so much fun being 100 that we want to share with you some history on our journey to 100! Check out the video below:

We’d love to help you get to 100, too! Contact us for more information.

Benchmarking: Part 3

You might have noticed, but we really want to see your business succeed from information gained through benchmarking. In other words, we want you to be a pro. But, before we unleash you to get started, we need to share a few things to avoid when you start a benchmarking analysis.

  • Comparing Company A to Company B: Make sure the peer group that you’re comparing to the business is representative of the industry. Comparing yourself to another, single company, can prevent you from seeing a true comparison if there are considerable differences. If you are looking at a benchmark analysis that restricts the sample size to only one other company, be critical in your findings.
  • Be aware that the benchmark analysis doesn’t end with a variance report: Once your report reaches the variances between its financial metrics and its peer group benchmarks, you might think you’re finished, but the work is just beginning. Don’t get worried — as the work is just beginning, so are the opportunities! When viewing the variances of your report you are now given potential problem areas to fix and also the opportunity to improve the overall performance of the company. For example, the variance report shows the areas of the business that are excelling. Now that you can see the areas of your company that have successes, see if this strategy can be implemented in other areas of the company.
  • Assume that numbers and performance are always changing: Positions in a car race are constantly shifting: first to third, second to last and so on. It isn’t optimal to compare your business to its peers only once per year, since many industries are always changing, even if your business isn’t. By preforming frequent benchmark analyses, your business can identify trends and react sooner.
  • Be mindful with calculations and the conclusions drawn from them: Certain benchmarks are common financial measurements (turnover rations, net profit margin, and liquidity rations) and their calculations generally do not change. If your benchmark analysis is expanded to include industry specific key performance indicators (KPIs) (airline-sales per seat, for example), make sure to use the same calculations, period after period. However, if a subaccount is added for one period but then removed the next period, the trend analysis performed might be misleading.
    • All members of management and the financial team need to understand the definitions of the metrics, and have a copy of them as well. You want to make sure there is only one interpretation, which will help defuse any confusion. Be sure everyone is on the same page to allow for complete and easy understanding.

It may not seem like a must do task, but benchmarking is important. When it comes down to it, remember the true purpose of benchmarking: to illuminate successes and challenges for your company, and to give you, the business owner, insights to inspire action!

*Shameless plug: If benchmarking sounds like the thing for you, let us know. We love helping businesses see how they’re doing!

 

Benchmarking: Part 2

In our latest blog post, we looked at why benchmarking is important for your business. Some of those reasons include:

  • It keeps you up to speed with real-time data (that is, as long as the data is timely, relevant, and accurate).
  • It never goes out of style and can be used continually, rather than a one-and-done solution.
  • It truly helps you understand the well-being of your business situation.

So now that we have a refresher of why benchmarking is great for your business, let’s dive in deeper. After you decide which data source you’ll use (make sure it’s accurate, timely and relevant), the challenge is now deciding which benchmarks to analyze and use as a tool for the success of your business.

We’ve said it before, but we will mention it again. Different industries, and different companies within an industry, might have different success measures. For example, a contractor might have large subcontractor expenditures. Are these expenses normal considering the contractor’s sales volume?

Instead of taking a look at industry-specific metrics, we’re going to focus on some metrics that are universally important and can provide a quick look into a company’s health.

  • Liquidity Ratios. Yes plural – because there are two that need to be analyzed together. They are:
    • Current Ratio which is shown as current assets divided by current liabilities. This metric shows general liquidity, but it does have some limitations. If inventory is included in calculating the current ratio, it might provide a distorted understanding of your cash flow.
    • Quick Ratio is expressed as cash accounts receivable divided by current liabilities. This ratio might not be perfect for showing liquidity, but it can be a useful and popular comparison to pair with the current ratio.
  • Net Profit Margin. Expressed as net-profit before taxes in a given period divided by sales. Another way to view this? How many cents of profit you extract from each dollar you earn in revenue. This might be a basic metric, but it’s extremely important!
  • Turnover Ratios. There are three ratios that you should consider:
    • Inventory Days which is shown as inventory divided by cost of goods sold, multiplied by 365 days. Inventory days tells the story of how long it takes to sell off inventory. However, it’s important to remember this ratio is very industry-specific. Imagine how long wine is stored in a winery compared to the length of time milk sits in a grocery store cooler. Usually, lower numbers are better.
    • Accounts Payable Ratio is expressed as accounts payable divided by cost of goods sold, multiplied by 365 days. The accounts payable ratio shows the number of days you take to pay the vendors. Higher numbers are better – it means you hold on to cash longer.
    • Accounts Receivable Ratio is shown as accounts receivable divided by sales, multiplied by 365 days. This is a rough measure of the number of days your company takes to turn accounts receivable to cash. You want lower numbers, as it is better to have cash in the bank than extra receivables on the books.

By paying attention to some of these important metrics, you can build a picture of where your business Is, where it should be going and what it will take to get there.

Benchmarking: Part 1

Do you ever wonder how your business does compared to others similar to you in size and industry? Maybe knowing this information would give you a more competitive drive, or would lead you to make some improvements to better your company. Or, maybe you’re just curious.

Whatever your reason for wanting to know, benchmarking can be a powerful tool to compare you to your peers and check your performance. Benchmarking can even lead to an overall greater level of success as a company.

Here are a few (of many) reasons why we think benchmarking is pretty awesome.

It never goes out of style| Benchmarking isn’t just a one and done concept. It can, and should, be used throughout the entire lifecycle of the business. As your numbers and statistics change, the same happens for the competition. Benchmarking can provide a real-time look into how your business is stacking up against the competition and industry trends, and can help you find solutions at any stage in your business.

Knowledge is power| When you see and understand how your business is ranking relative to similar businesses, you can empower management to evaluate company performance and make informed decisions. This information can also be used to identify new and future opportunities that can lead to greater growth and success. To accomplish this, it’s best to compare on an industry or peer group level, rather than just a one-company comparison.

Data doesn’t lie| Without good data, you’re wasting your time. Make sure to look for data from benchmarking that is:

  • Relevant – Data won’t mean much to you if it isn’t relevant to your business. Make sure you consider your geography, size and industry when getting your data. Each has their own trends and characteristics that are incorporated into the data – which makes for a meaningful comparison.
  • Timely – You want to be sure the benchmarks being used are the most recent available, which helps account for seasonality, economic cycles and other fluctuating factors.
  • Accurate – If you’re making sure your data is relevant, it will likely be accurate too. However, it’s always a good idea to verify the data before applying to make important decisions.

A way to measure success| Each business and industry (even businesses in the same industry) has a different way of measuring what success means to them. While you can only decide what success looks like for your business, there are a few metrics that can provide a quick, high level view of your business’s well-being:

  • Net Profit Margin = Net profit before taxes, divided by sales
  • Liquidity Ratio – Current Ratio = Total current assets divided by total current liabilities
  • Turnover ratios, which include inventory days, accounts receivable days and accounts payable days.

As you can see above, benchmarking is a great way to get a picture of how your business is really doing compared to those around it. Using this information, you can feel comfortable making changes to better grow and improve your business.

A Millennial’s View

Guest blog by: Isaac Bumgarden, audit intern, Eide Bailly LLP

Accountant: the career that seems like it’s filled with numbers nerds, gloomy days reading over spreadsheets and days spent typing away on a calculator. If we’re talking about a public accountant, everyone thinks you’re an evil number cruncher who’s up to no good (and maybe even works for the IRS).

So how does someone, let alone a millennial, decide accounting is the right career path?

As you know, everyone is different (yes, even us millennials have different tastes and interests). While I don’t speak for everyone, it seems a majority of millennials have a similar experience when it comes to choosing a career, especially if they landed on accounting. When looking at the accounting profession (at least before having much exposure to it), we tend to think of someone sitting behind a desk, quickly punching numbers into a calculator all day, or even someone working for the IRS – and often times, these views don’t seem to sit well with us millennials. After all, we are said to be a social generation which thrives off of each other.

However, college and schooling comes around, and a whole new world presents itself. Rather than hearing about the IRS auditors, you start learning about different options in the accounting world.

“A CFO? What’s that?”

            “There are other auditors besides the IRS? Well what’s the difference?”

           “I can open up my own tax accounting firm in my small home town if I                           understand this stuff?”

You begin to realize that maybe accounting isn’t a one-size-fits-all career path, and there might even be something about it that catches your eye. In fact, I see accounting as a door that leads to a lot of potential in the business world, which is something I never would have even thought of on my own.

Many of the potential scenarios in accounting appeal to us millennials if we are exposed to these options. If you enjoy being alone, maybe the traditional accounting job is for you. If you like interacting with people, take a look at the business side of accounting, such as being a CFO, where you get to go in and work alongside different companies. If travel is your idea of an ideal career, maybe an auditor is the right choice for you. There are many different opportunities and possibilities for each personality and skill set.

For myself (and other millennials, too) and even the general public, accounting is often seen as a boring profession, as explained before. However, accounting is so much more than just the numbers. Public accounting is not only a way to help individuals, but businesses as well.

Being an auditor allows you to help businesses be sure they are on the right track both legally and financially. If you’re the tax man (or woman), you can make sure individuals, families and businesses are being taxed properly, which can lead to saved money and greater revenue and income. Many people don’t realize accounting truly allows you to help people do what they love.

It seems the reason millennials aren’t choosing accounting as readily as other generations simply stems from the lack of information about what accounting really entails. When it comes to accounting, you’re never really stuck in one area. We millennials enjoy variety and a change in scenery, and accounting allows us to have just that.

Is it Time to Upgrade?

Accounting software is a great tool for your business. It helps you keep track of invoices, let’s you see where are your money is going and even allows you to access your information basically anytime, anywhere.

But if your accounting software is out of date, it actually might be doing more harm than good for your business. Here are some signs that it might be time to look into an updated system.

  • Are you still communicating with vendors and customers through email or even *gasp* snail mail? If so, it may be time to look for a system that provides an easier way to communicate.
  • If your desk is covered in papers and you have paper invoices and timecards coming out your ears, it’s time to stop endangering the tree population and look into a system that can do this electronically.
  • It might be time to look into some new software if your system doesn’t allow you to look at your information anytime, anywhere. This includes your cell phone – many systems allow you to have all of your information at the swipe of a finger.
  • Is your chart of accounts endless? Or, maybe you need to create a whole new set of accounts each time you add another profit or cost center (grants, jobs, products lines, etc.). Either way, both are major signs that it’s time to upgrade and update.
  • Your account system should do what you need it to, without you having to perform extra steps and work arounds. If your system is doing the exact opposite of its intended purpose, it’s time for something new.
  • If your vendor has completely stopped (or won’t be for much longer) supporting your software, you’ll need to upgrade. Although this sounds pretty obvious, we see this problem quite often!
  • It’s time to upgrade to a new system if you’re still using spreadsheets to track date and compute calculations. (Hint: accounting software does this for you!)
  • Here’s a big one. Do you enter manual journal entries – maybe you’ve even compiled them in your spreadsheets? Are you operating in several systems that don’t sync together? Time to get on board with a new, updated system!
  • Consider how much time you are devoting to closing the books each month. If you’re manually creating reports and manually completing the consolidation process, you’re wasting your time. An updated system can help you save your time to dedicate to other parts of your business.

If any of these common warning signs sound like something you are experiencing, now is probably a good time to start looking for new, updated accounting software. Although the transition won’t be easy, the benefits to your business will be worth it!