How to Manage Change in Your Organization

Change is inevitable, and that’s a fact. Making changes in your business allows you to stay up-to-date on trends, keep up with the competition and remain a force to be reckoned with in your industry. In order for change to be successful, you need to make sure your people are on board. Often, this can be quite a challenge. What if your employees react negatively or don’t adopt a new form of technology the way you had hoped?

A concept called change management can help get your employees on board and be accepting of new changes in your business. Change management can provide a framework to help leaders engage the entire organization and give them a sense of why the changes are being made, as well as how and who it will impact.

Here are five change management concepts to follow when implementing a big change in your business – whether it be new technology, reorganizing your teams or something else.

  1. Communication is key – Change can create some uneasy feelings, uncertainty and even resistance. The last thing you want to do is ignore these issues. The best idea is to acknowledge and address them as soon as they come up. This can lead to higher levels of support, more employee acceptance and more buy-in. People who feel uninformed or neglected throughout change are going to be less open to adopting what’s new, so communicating with everyone throughout the process ensures no one will feel left out.
  2. Support from the top – Getting executives and senior level management to support change can almost ensure a successful change initiative. When leadership is on board, it shows all others that if the executives support the change, it is likely worthwhile. In order to get this effect, leadership needs to embrace the change to unify and motivate the rest of the organization. If you have a leadership team who doesn’t support the initiative, it is likely destined to crash and burn.
  3. Dedicate a go-to person – To make matters a little simpler, consider dedicating one person to drive progress and lead the communication across the entire organization. This one person will act as a touchpoint for feedback, questions and concerns, and will be able to communicate them with key stakeholders. They could also deliver updates and progress reports to the organizations to keep everyone up-to-date. How do you choose this person? Consider the type of change you are initiating. If it involves technology, look to your IT people and see who would be the best fit. If it involves management of daily work life, consider and HR professional to be this person.
  4. Offer loads of training – If you’re initiating any kind of change that involves a disruption of how things are usually done, people will need to learn the new way of doing things. Offering technical and process training can help employees understand the aspects and impacts of the new technology, system, etc. This can help them understand how their everyday work will change and what to do to adapt. This can help keep your team engaged in the change adoption and can continue to foster communication and involvement throughout the process.
  5. Measure success – For any type of change to be successful, it needs to be adopted and accepted by those impacted by it. To know if a change initiative is successful, you need to measure the impacts of it. Have a plan to measure key data before, during and after the change to see how well it was received by the organization. This will help you identify what is working well, what might need to be improved and whether the change is still a good idea for your organization.

Change is hard – there’s no doubt about it. However, by practicing some of these ideas, you can implement a smooth change initiative that will have a successful and positive impact on your business.

A version of this blog first appeared on Eide Bailly’s Technology Consulting Blog.

 

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