Common Troublemakers on the Books

By: Ryan Renner, Eide Bailly LLP

A while back, we discussed some ways to know when things go wrong on your books. When something goes wrong, it’s important to understand the root cause in order to hopefully avoid the problem altogether. While there are many pesky problem causers, the basic concepts of these generally apply to a lot of the most common errors.

Here are a couple of the most common troublemakers we see causing problems on the books.

Lack of Consistency

Often times, errors start in areas of the books that are unfamiliar or new to small business accountants (we can help you get familiar with them – just ask). When these processes aren’t completed consistently and accurately, this can lead to issues over the course of the year that, if not caught right away, can cause even bigger issues down the road.

One common example? Those pesky balance sheets. Balance sheets contain a lot of important information that can tell you where your business stands and where it’s going in the future. If you only reconcile them annually, or convert from a cash to accrual basis at the end of the year, you could end up forgetting what you did previously, and you might even be doing it a little differently. The problem? This can often lead to issues with your prior and current year balances being calculated differently, resulting in balances that don’t make sense.

The best way to correct this common issue and prevent it from taking over is to implement a consistent process over the course of the year. Consider setting up monthly or quarterly updates and reviews. This can help you keep information fresh in your mind (as opposed to trying to figure out how to record something in December that happened back in April), and can also help you remember how a process was completed previously. Although this might add time up front, it can help save time in the long run. Whether you spend your time trying to remember what occurred earlier in the year or trying to find an error caused by a change in your processes, your year-end can become much more efficient when you come up with a consistent process, leading to less errors on the books.

If implementing a consistent monthly process sounds confusing, know that you can always check with your accountant or auditor to make sure you’re doing things correctly from the start. They can help you make sure you’re on the right track, and can help make your process a breeze. 

Letting Issues Grow

Another common issue that leads to major problems on the books is letting issues go and deciding you will take care of them later. Once example is sitting back and ignoring small differences in the details, such as in your bank reconciliations. Generally, we see accountants noticing these small errors, spending a little bit of time of them and then letting them go if they can’t figure out what is going on. They usually push them off and just assume they will figure it out next month.

However, by letting them go and pushing them off until next month, these issues will only continue to grow. If allowed to sit and grow for too long, the issues can build up until you find your business with some serious problems. Although it may seem like a small, pesky task at the time, taking care of issues right away can save you time (and help you keep your calm) later in the future.

It’s also important to note that if these seemingly small issues keep popping up every month, even when you took care of them previously, you may have an even larger underlying problem. Don’t be afraid to seek out assistance when it comes to issues in your business – after all, you’ve invested a lot in it, and you want to make sure everything is in tip-top shape!

Entries from Your Accountants

Your accountants are there to help you and your business grow and be successful, and they really know their stuff. A common (and somewhat perplexing) issue we see is companies and organizations not booking entries from their accountants. Rather than taking the year-end tax or audit work information and putting it in the books, companies often ignore it or post it to the wrong period. Rather than waving this off, schedule time to talk to your accountant to make sure you fully understand what they’re telling you, and ask for help posting them to the books (numbers nerds enjoy helping you understand your finances!).

When it comes to your business, it’s likely you will run into a few speed bumps. When you run into these issues, work to identify what caused the problems in the first place. By identifying these issues and taking care of them right away, you protect your business from falling victim to common mistakes that can seriously impact the success of your business.

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