Benchmarking: Part 3

You might have noticed, but we really want to see your business succeed from information gained through benchmarking. In other words, we want you to be a pro. But, before we unleash you to get started, we need to share a few things to avoid when you start a benchmarking analysis.

  • Comparing Company A to Company B: Make sure the peer group that you’re comparing to the business is representative of the industry. Comparing yourself to another, single company, can prevent you from seeing a true comparison if there are considerable differences. If you are looking at a benchmark analysis that restricts the sample size to only one other company, be critical in your findings.
  • Be aware that the benchmark analysis doesn’t end with a variance report: Once your report reaches the variances between its financial metrics and its peer group benchmarks, you might think you’re finished, but the work is just beginning. Don’t get worried — as the work is just beginning, so are the opportunities! When viewing the variances of your report you are now given potential problem areas to fix and also the opportunity to improve the overall performance of the company. For example, the variance report shows the areas of the business that are excelling. Now that you can see the areas of your company that have successes, see if this strategy can be implemented in other areas of the company.
  • Assume that numbers and performance are always changing: Positions in a car race are constantly shifting: first to third, second to last and so on. It isn’t optimal to compare your business to its peers only once per year, since many industries are always changing, even if your business isn’t. By preforming frequent benchmark analyses, your business can identify trends and react sooner.
  • Be mindful with calculations and the conclusions drawn from them: Certain benchmarks are common financial measurements (turnover rations, net profit margin, and liquidity rations) and their calculations generally do not change. If your benchmark analysis is expanded to include industry specific key performance indicators (KPIs) (airline-sales per seat, for example), make sure to use the same calculations, period after period. However, if a subaccount is added for one period but then removed the next period, the trend analysis performed might be misleading.
    • All members of management and the financial team need to understand the definitions of the metrics, and have a copy of them as well. You want to make sure there is only one interpretation, which will help defuse any confusion. Be sure everyone is on the same page to allow for complete and easy understanding.

It may not seem like a must do task, but benchmarking is important. When it comes down to it, remember the true purpose of benchmarking: to illuminate successes and challenges for your company, and to give you, the business owner, insights to inspire action!

*Shameless plug: If benchmarking sounds like the thing for you, let us know. We love helping businesses see how they’re doing!

 

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