Have Questions? We have Answers

In our line of work, we get a lot of questions on anything and everything related to owning and operating a business (and we’re happy to answer them, too)! While a lot of these questions are usually pretty easy to answer, sometimes we get a few that really make us think. Even then, we enjoy researching and finding the answers to help business owners be successful.

So, what questions do you have about your business? We would love to help you reach your dreams and goals.

In case you think your question might be too far out there, we promise it’s not. Check out some of these questions (and our answers) to get you started on finding the information you need to watch your business succeed.

“I have invoices coming out of my ears! What do I do with all of them?”

When you have a large amount of invoices to deal with, it’s easy to get overwhelmed and lose track of what needs to get done. When invoices aren’t being properly managed, your business can see some serious negative side effects, such as fraud. Looking to an automated system, such as QuickBooks, is also a great way to keep your invoices at a manageable level.

“Where in the world did all of my cash go?”

This question is more common than you may think. While your business may be profitable, you can still be running out of cash, which might be a concern. Financial struggles can be hard, but our professionals are available to help. Check out this blog – and then, let’s talk!

“Why don’t I have enough time to do everything that needs to get done?”

We get it: owning and operating a business means you have a lot on your plate. From accounting and finance, to human resources to the day-to-day operations, you probably don’t have enough time to do it all yourself. The good news is you don’t have to! Consider your team of employees. What can you delegate to take some of the burden off your shoulders and free up some time? Another option is outsourcing. When you outsource some of your business activities, such as your accounting processes, you free up time to focus on why you got into business in the first place.

“What is this accrual accounting thing I hear so much about? Am I doing it?”

Knowing the specific ins and outs of accounting can be a confusing, daunting task. What it comes to what method of accounting you are using, the water may get even muddier. Maybe you’ve heard of cash based accounting and accrual accounting, but you really have no idea where to begin. We’ve written multiple blogs on how to tell the difference and how to select what fits your business and set up your books. Check them out!

“Taxes terrify me. Where do I even begin?”

Taxes are a complex issue, and questions regarding this topic are common. Whether you want to know more about R&D tax credits, employer vehicles and mileage, how to track your taxes or even all those pesky (yet necessary) forms, we’ve got you covered. Check out our tax archive for answers to all your most pressing questions. If you can’t find the answer, let us know.

Remember, although we numbers nerds really like our financial lingo, we promise to answer your questions in a way you will understand, not just a bunch of accountant talk. After all, we want to see your business succeed!

The Sales Tax Cap

It’s time for a facelift. Last summer, we posted a blog about the North Dakota sales tax cap, and to this date, we still get tons of views on it. What does this mean? It’s a hot topic that’s important to business owners! So, we decided to bring it front and center again so you can get all the info you need without having to dig too far (we’re nice like that).

If you’re doing business in the state of North Dakota, there’s some important tax issues you need to know about: local sales tax cap and minimum tax.

There are multiple cities and counties in North Dakota, which means there are multiple local sales tax jurisdictions that have a max amount of sales tax you are responsible to pay – or, in other words, the refund cap. However, it’s not the vendor’s responsibility to cap the sales tax on your purchase.

The good news? You can submit a claim for a refund with the State!

So, how does all this cap stuff even work? Let’s look at an example:

Gary is working on a project, and bought $10,000 worth of lumber. He had the lumber delivered right to the job site – which is located in Fargo. He received a bill from the vendor, with the total being $10,750. This included sales tax at a rate of 7.5%, which was properly imposed.

Material Cost    $10,000.00

            Sales Tax                 750.00     

            Total                 $10,750.00

Gary went ahead and paid the bill for $10,750. However, in this case, the sales tax on the purchase is in excess of the maximum tax. This means Gary should apply for a refund. But how is the sales tax more?

Well…

The Fargo sales tax rate – which is the 7.5% that was applied to the purchase – is made up of three components:

State of North Dakota   5.0%

            City of Fargo                2.0%

            Cass County                  0.5%

The maximum tax for the City of Fargo is $50, while $12.50 is the maximum tax for Cass County (the State itself doesn’t have a maximum tax). In other words, the sales tax only applies to the first $2,500 of your purchase. Let’s recalculate Gary’s bill using the tax cap:

Material Cost    $10,000.00   

            Sales Tax               562.50

            Total                 $10,562.50

Confused about where the $562.50 came from? State tax = $500 ($10,000*5.0%), City tax = $50 ($2,500*2.0%), and County tax = $12.50 ($2,500*0.5%).

This means that our good friend Gary is eligible for a refund of $187.50 from the State of North Dakota – and who doesn’t love getting money back?

So how does Gary go about getting his refund?

Easy as cake (which Gary could definitely indulge in with his refund money)!

  1. Visit https://www.nd.gov/tax/salesanduse/forms/
  2. Under “Other Forms” click on “Claim for Refund Local Sales and Use Tax Paid Beyond Maximum Tax
  3. Follow the instructions to complete and send back

A few other things to keep in mind with maximum tax include:

  • The refund claim must be postmarked no later than three years from the date of the invoice. (This means if you weren’t aware of the cap, you can look back three years and see if you have any claims to submit!)
  • You need to include with the form a copy of all invoices covered by the claim.
  • The refund claim only applies on properly imposed sales tax – which means the sales tax needs to be right in order to claim a refund from the state.
  • The refund claim applies to a single transaction, not an item on a transaction or total purchases for a month.
  • Not all cities and counties impose a maximum tax. The claim for refund form has a table which outlines the cities and counties that impose this tax.

If you still have questions, let us know. We have tax people who can help make taxes a little less… taxing.

A Community Resource: Emerging Prairie

Guest Blog By: Annie Wood, Director of Community Programs, Emerging Prairie

Founded in 2013, Emerging Prairie began with the goal to create a community we all want to be part of. We want to do our part to make Fargo a great place to bet on ideas, start companies and improve the human condition through technology-based solutions. In 2016, Emerging Prairie became a non-profit organization and maintains its mission to connect and celebrate the entrepreneurial ecosystem.

At Emerging Prairie, we live out our mission in multiple ways:

– Platforms: we have an online content publication and several events that create opportunities for people to share and spread their ideas. We also utilize platforms like 1 Million Cups (caffeinated by the Kauffman Foundation) and TEDxFargo to help champion these ideas.

– Coworking: we run The Prairie Den, a coworking and event space in downtown Fargo. The Den provides a home for startups, small businesses, entrepreneurs, an office away from the office for other organizations, and a place for people to meet.

– Connecting: we run multiple programs and groups that are designed for authentic connection for entrepreneurs to connect to other entrepreneurs, as well as build connections between members of the community.

– Convening: we play a role in helping bring entrepreneurs together so our community learns together and can share what we collectively need when folks like the Bank of North Dakota are working on new ways to serve the startup community.

Companies of any stage can connect with us. Some of our programs are geared to companies of different sizes, stages and industries. For example, 1 Million Cups Fargo (which is supported by the Kauffman Foundation) is curated to be primarily tech-based founders or entrepreneurs who have a product or software as a service (SaaS) companies. We work to put founders first, so many of our programs are more geared toward supporting founders versus the size and stage of the company.

The Prairie Den is an inclusive space in the heart of downtown Fargo – it’s truly a place for community to be built. We think of it like a student union for our city. Just like a student union on a college campus is a place for students to study, hold meetings and social events, The Prairie Den provides a similar area to the community. It’s a place for connecting, for working, for moving ideas forward, and for groups to gather. We offer workspace for teams, individuals, and as an office-away-from-the-office for employees of many organizations. We also have conference rooms, a classroom and even an event space that we rent to members and non-members.

The Den is also where Co.Starters is hosted by our friends at Folkways. Co.Starters is a nine-week course to help people with ideas turn them into businesses, or people with young businesses strengthen them.

Emerging Prairie subscribes to the Fargo Thesis, which Co-Founder and Executive Director Greg Tehven first wrote about in Fargo Monthly. The Fargo Thesis is to Connect It, Believe It and Love It. This is how we operate in our community –Connecting people; Believing that Fargo is a place of possibility; and showing love by celebrating and caring for community members.

As an organization, Emerging Prairie is excited about continuing to support our startup community. We believe ideas matter. We know it’s a leap of faith to start something new, so we want to celebrate those who take the leap. And we want to be an organization that helps pave the way for founders to bet on their ideas, to build teams around them and to pursue possibilities to create a community that we all want to be part of.

Setting up for Success: Part 2

Welcome to our “Setting up for Success: Part 2” blog post. Part one focused on selecting a basis for your accounting and determining what information you need to track in your business.

Now that you understand what you need to track, how do you track this important information?

You can start by developing your chart of accounts. We know what you’re thinking: “develop my what?!”

Your chart of accounts is a listing of accounts that are needed to prepare financial statements and reports. A typical structure looks like this:

1000-1999 Assets

            2000-2999 Liabilities 

            3000-3999 Equity

            4000-4999 Sales

            5000-5999 Cost of Goods Sold (COGS)

            6000-6999 Operating Expenses (General and Administrative)

            7000-7999 Other Income and Expense

            8000-8999 Income Tax Expense

Account numbered 1000-3999 are used in preparing the balance sheet, while numbers 4000-8999 are used in preparing the income statement, which focuses on profit and loss. Of course, the number of individual accounts within each category will depend on the specific needs of your business.

A good rule to keep practice is to try to use the least number of accounts to attain the financial information you need, and structure it for growth.

What do we mean by growth? Let’s take a closer look at the assets section:

1000 Petty Cash

            1005 Checking

            1010 Savings

            1100 Accounts Receivable

            1200 Inventory

            1300 Prepaid Expenses

            1400 Fixed Assets

            1450 Accumulated Depreciation

You probably noticed the account numbers aren’t in sequential order. This allows for room for growth in your business.

You can also use the chart of accounts to track different jobs, departments, segments, etc. For example, maybe your business has locations across the Midwest in Fargo, Minneapolis and Sioux Falls. You want to be able to see how profitable you are at each location. You can track each location by assigning a division number, such as 01-Fargo, 02-Minneapolis, 03-Sioux Falls, and then attaching each division number to each of the accounts, like this:

            4000-01 Sales

            4000-02 Sales

            4000-03 Sales

            5000-01 COGS

            5000-02 COGS

            5000-03 COGS

Now that you know what information you need and how to track it, you can select an accounting system to help you track and keep information in order.

There are two options for tracking your information: manually or electronically (think desktop or cloud based). While there is no right or wrong way, computerized accounting is usually more efficient, which is leading to manual accounting becoming a dinosaur in today’s accounting world. Cloud based accounting also gives you the freedom to access your information anytime, anywhere. Who doesn’t love simplicity and accessibility?

It’s important, as always, to remember that each business is different, so accounting systems usually aren’t one size fits all. Doing your research and truly understanding your business’ needs can help you select a system that gives you the best possible results.

If all of this seems overwhelming, fear not. We have the resources and talent to help you design an accounting system that can set your business up for success.

Cheers to 100 Years

By: Clinton Larson, Eide Bailly LLP

Raise your hand if you’re 100—hey, that’s us! We’re celebrating our centennial this year, and like wine and cheese and lots of other good things, we keep getting better with age.

Reaching a century in business didn’t come easily, as you could probably guess. It takes commitment and foresight, the right people and the right attitude. Lots of companies have come and gone in that time, and even our own heritage involved two different Fargo firms growing, pinnacling and deciding to forge a new path together.

So how can your company make it to 100? Well … there’s a lot of variables that go into that equation. However, there’s no specific formula to share, and it’s hard to know what the world will look like in 2117 (although we hope it involves some cool, legitimate hoverboards, or something went terribly wrong.).

However, we can share five areas of focus that have helped us reach 100. Even if your business is just a year old, or maybe 10, our advice can help your business grow and prosper.

Innovation

For most of the 20th century, accountants relied on pencils and ledger books to do their jobs. Then came calculators and computers, and now smartphones can do it all. Through every step, we’ve embraced technology to help us work more efficiently and better serve our clients. Change is inevitable, so be innovative and learn how to harness it to your advantage. For example, we’ve made technology consulting a part of our suite of services, and we’ve recently created a cyber security team to help clients deal with the ramifications of that technology. Always be on the lookout for ways to innovate.

Culture

Simply stated, culture is the personality of your company. It often develops organically from your company values and actions. But that doesn’t mean you can’t make it official or create goals. When Eide Bailly merged in 1998 (formerly Eide Helmeke and Charles Bailly), the partners sat down and listed the qualities they wanted the new firm to represent. That list turned into the culture statement, and it’s at the heart of who Eide Bailly is as a firm — and we make sure to walk the walk when it comes to those words. We have regular celebrations and outings to encourage fun, and we have benefits that promote a positive firm, like a wellness benefit and a branded apparel allowance. Make sure your own goals for your culture are well-known and show in everything you do.

People

Hiring the right staff is a critical component of any successful business, as we’ve discussed before, but it doesn’t end there. You need to give your staff all the tools they need to succeed, and that includes the proper training. Our managing partners have all believed in giving staff the keys they need to unlock their potential, which includes robust training both inside and outside the firm. Be sure you not only hire the right people, but give them every opportunity to grow and improve themselves.

“My business philosophy in a sentence is we have great people, trust them to do their work,” says our Managing Partner/CEO Dave Stende.

Community

When our clients succeed, so do we, which is why we invest so much into helping the communities we serve. Part of our growth strategy through the years has been to expand in the Midwest and western regions of the U.S., but we do more than just add offices in new cities and states. We engage with the communities through volunteering, sponsorships and more. We even have a corporate responsibility initiative that officially encourages giving back by our staff. Build up the people around you—thriving businesses grow in thriving communities.

Vision

This may sound cliché, but part of the way to make it to 100 is to simply envision yourself achieving that goal. Having a vision for your business is critical to longevity. Eide Bailly’s first Managing Partner/CEO, Darold Rath, felt being located in Fargo shouldn’t be a hindrance to hiring the best and being a major player in the accounting industry. Both Managing Partners/CEOs after that, Jerry Topp and Dave Stende, achieved visions of doubling the size of the firm every five years. Dream big about what you want out of your company. You can’t reach goals you never visualize.

Reaching 100 isn’t easy, and unfortunately, not every business makes it. However, by following some of these tips, your business might just make it to see if hoverboards do, in fact, show up in 2117.