Forms, forms and more forms

There are many forms to remember as part of owning a business. There are forms to document employee wages, forms for contractors, forms for donated vehicles, forms for acquisitions … the list goes on and on.

Understanding what each form is, and which ones you need to fill out, is an important aspect of your business. Today we’re breaking down some of the most common information return forms and what gets reported on them.

First we’ll start with a definition. An information return is a tax document businesses use to let the IRS know about transactions. These forms are mandatory, meaning you don’t get a choice in filling them out and reporting your transactions to the IRS.

Now on to the forms …

 

Form W-2

The W-2 is also known as the wage and tax statement. It should be pretty familiar as it is used to document wages, tips and other compensation, Medicare, Social Security, income tax withholdings and more for each of your employees.

Every employer in a trade or business with employees who are compensated for their work needs to fill out the Form W-2 for them. If income, social security or Medicare tax was withheld, you get to fill out this form for your employees.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31, for federal and most states
  • To IRS: January 31both e-file and paper copies

 

Form W-2G

Form W-2G is a specific form used for gambling winnings and losses. You will need to file a W-2G if you receive:

  • $600 or more in gambling winnings (if the payout is at least 300 times the amount of the wager)
  • $1,200 or more in winnings from bingo or slot machines
  • $1,500 or more from keno
  • More than $5,000 from a poker tournament

As a friendly reminder, all gambling winnings are subject to income tax.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099 Series

The Form 1099 series is a group of forms used to report ordinary kinds of payments, such as dividends, interest, retirement distributions and miscellaneous income payments.

Form 1099-MISC

Form 1099-MISC is filed by a business for payments made to nonemployees who do work for your business or trade. In other words, if they’re not an employee, but you’re paying them for a service, you have to report it on Form 1099-MISC.

Form 1099-MISC is required for each person you’ve made payments to based on the following criteria:

  • $10 or more in royalties or broker payments in lieu of dividends or tax-exempt interest
  • $600 or more in rents, services, prizes and awards, other income payments, medical and health care payments, crop insurance proceeds, cash payments for fish you purchase or cash paid from notional principal contract to an individual, partnership or estate
  • Any fish boat proceeds
  • Gross proceeds to an attorney
  • Direct sales of at least $5,000 of consumer products to a buyer for resale anywhere other than a permanent retail establishment
  • Any backup withholding regardless of the amount

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31, for federal and most states
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically) or January 31 (if any payments for nonemployee compensation are reported in box 7)

 

Form 1099-DIV

This form is used for dividends and distributions. Specifically it’s filed for each person for whom you’ve:

  • Paid dividends and other distributions on stock of $10 or more
  • Withheld or paid any foreign tax on dividends and other distributions of stock
  • Withheld any federal income tax under the backup withholding rules
  • Paid $600 or more as part of a liquidation

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-INT

The Interest Income form is used for reporting interest payments when:

  • Interest of $10 or more is paid or credited on earnings
  • Interest of $600 or more from other sources in the course of trade or business
  • Forfeited interest due to premature withdrawals of time deposits
  • Federal backup withholding and foreign tax withholding and paid on interest
  • Payments of any interest to bearers of certificates of deposit

This form is specifically for interest payments made in the course of your trade or business, including federal, state and local government agencies.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-OID

Form 1099-OID is also known as the Original Issue Discount. It’s used when you purchase a bond for lesser price than the face value or principle amount. This discount is given instead of a bond earning interest. If you purchase a bond for less the face value, you should receive a Form 1099-OID, which is where you report $10 or more in gross income from that bond.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-R

This form is used to report any distribution of $10 or more form pension sharing or retirement plans, any individual retirement arrangements, annuities, pensions, insurance contracts, etc. It’s also used to report death benefit payments made by you as the employer that are not part of a pension, profit-sharing or retirement plan.

The fun part about Form 1099-R is that there are nine numeric codes and 18 alpha codes to use when reporting amounts in box 7 of the form. For more information on these, and what to put in what box, check out our W2/1099 ebook.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-PATR

This form is specific to cooperatives and must be filled out if $10 or more in distributions paid from the cooperative is passed through to their patrons. This includes any domestic production activities deduction and certain pass-through credits.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-LTC

This form is used if you pay any long-term care benefits, including accelerated death benefits. Payers include insurance companies, governmental units and viatical settlement providers.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-SA

Here we’re looking at reporting distributions made from an HSA, Archer MSA or Medicare Advantage MSA. Form 1099-SA can be used if the distribution is paid directly to a medical service provider or to the account holder. A separate return has to be filed for each plan type.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-A

Also known as the Acquisition or Abandonment of Secured Property, Form 1099-A is used for each borrower you lend money to in connection with your trade or business. Specifically, this applies to the full or partial satisfaction of a debt.

Deadline:

  • To borrower: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-C

Use this form for each debtor for whom debt of $600 or more was cancelled. Specifically, you must file Form 1099-C if:

  • You are a financial institution
  • A credit union
  • A corporation that is a subsidiary of a financial institution or credit union
  • A federal government agency
  • An organization whose significant trade or business is the lending of money

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-B

Form 1099-B is specifically for a broker or barter exchange. It must be filled out for each person for whom the broker:

  • Sold stocks, bonds commodities, regulated future contracts, foreign currency contracts, debt instruments, etc. for cash
  • Received cash, stock or other property from a corporation that the broker knows had stock acquired in an acquisition
  • Exchanged property or services through a barter exchange

Deadline:

  • To recipient: February 15
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-K

This one is specific to a payment settlement entity (PSE) for payments made in settlement of reportable payment transactions within the calendar year.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-Q

Form 1099-Q is used for payments from qualified education programs. Specifically, you must file this form if you’re an officer or employee having control of a program established by an eligible educational institution and have made a distribution from a qualified tuition program.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1042-S

This form is used to report income subject to withholding paid to nonresident aliens, foreign partnerships, foreign corporations or nonresident alien or foreign fiduciaries of estates or trusts.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: March 15
  • To IRS: March 15

 

The moral of the story

This is a high level overview of just some of the information returns that exist. It’s important to understand what forms apply to your organization and what information to report on each form. To learn more, check out our W2/1099 year end planning book or contact your business advisor.

 

 

1099 Reminder

Way back in July, we taught you the basics of the 1099 forms. Now that the deadlines for these forms are coming into view, we thought we would give you some tips and helpful reminders for getting them filled out.

Wait, what are these for again?

The most common type of 1099, the 1099-MISC, needs to be completed for anyone who has provided services to you amounting to $600 or more. This can be anything from accounting services to snow removal – if it was $600 or greater worth of work, it goes on the 1099-MISC. However there are a few exceptions to the rule (go figure!). A 1099-MISC isn’t required if:

  • The company providing the services is incorporated – except with lawyers.
  • The person who provided services is your employee.
  • The amount of services provided is less than $600 worth.

Do I need to report anything else on the form?

The 1099-MISC requires you to report any rent paid to an individual or business that isn’t incorporated. It also requires you to report royalties of $10 or more and any other income payments such awards and prizes, and even employee wages paid after death. In other words, most miscellaneous payments are reported on the 1099-MISC.

Any other forms I should know about?

Another common 1099 is the 1099-INT. This form focuses on – you guessed it – interest reporting. Any interest paid amounting to $10 or more, any foreign tax and interest or backup federal withholdings – regardless of the interest payment amount — must be reported on this form.

So, when are they due?

Depending on the type of form you are filing, the due dates may vary. The IRS website gives a great picture of when each form is due. You can check it out here.

Anything else I should know before I get to work filling these out?

As always, these forms are more complex than meets the eye, and this list of items to include is not all-inclusive. Our pals at the IRS do a great job of explaining them, and we’ve also crafted a handy blog to help you get a picture of what these forms include.

We’re hopeful these reminders will give you the information (see what we did there?) you need to fill out the 1099. If your head is still spinning, let us know. We’re always here to help!

The Importance of Classifying Workers

Recently, the IRS released a fact sheet to help remind small businesses of the importance of correctly classifying workers. Sometimes IRS lingo can be complicated, so we broke it down for you.

Let’s start with the question that’s probably going through your head – why does this matter?

When you classify your workers, this can help determine if you need to withhold income, social security and Medicare taxes. It also helps determine if you actually have to pay these taxes on employee wages. When it comes to independent contractors, businesses usually don’t have to withhold or pay taxes. If you’re not classifying correctly, you can get stuck with some harsh fines and penalties.

So how do you determine if the individual is an independent contractor or an employee? One general rule to follow is that your worker is an independent contractor if the business has the right to control only the result of the work, not how the work will be done. However, there are three categories that can help you make your determination.

Behavioral Control

A worker is considered an employee when the business gets to be bossy. Okay, maybe bossy isn’t the right word, but the business does have the right to direct and control the work being done. Behavioral control can be broken down into a few more distinct categories:

  • Type of instructions – This can include telling the employee where to work, when to do the work and how the work should be done.
  • Instruction complexity – The higher the complexity of the instructions given, the more likely it is the individual is an employee. When the instructions have less detail, this gives the worker more control to do the job how they see fit, which points towards the worker being an independent contractor.
  • Evaluation – How a business evaluates the work can help determine if the worker is an employee or contractor. If the details of how the work was done are evaluated, then the worker is likely an employee. However, if only the end product is being evaluated, it’s more likely you have a contractor.
  • Training – This one is fairly simple. Would you like someone else telling you how to do your job? If a worker is an employee, the business has the authority to do just that. For independent contractors, they are the experts and generally don’t require training from the hiring company.

Control over Finances

This category looks at what control the business has over the financial and business pieces of the worker’s job. Factors to consider include:

  • Equipment investment – Independent contractors are much more likely than employees to make significant investments in the equipment they are using to get the job done. Employees are often provided equipment from their employer, rather than investing in it on their own.
  • Expense reimbursement – Businesses generally reimburse expenses for their employees, not for independent contractors.
  • Availability – Independent contractors generally have the freedom to seek out more business opportunities, while employees work is usually contained to the one business.
  • Payment – This one is easy to understand. When you have employees, you usually guarantee them a regular wage. With independent contractors, a flat fee is usually agreed upon and paid on the completion of the work.

Relationship Elements

What the business or worker offers in the relationship can also determine classification. Some key elements to consider are:

  • Contracts – Written contracts which describe the relationship the parties plan to create are a fairly simple way to determine which type of worker the business has. However, it’s important to note that a contract stating the worker is a contractor or an employee isn’t enough on its own to classify the worker’s status.
  • Benefits – Insurance, retirement, vacation and sick pay are benefits provided to employees. It’s rare for these benefits to be given to independent contractors.
  • Forever or just a fling – The length of time of the relationship can help determine a worker’s status. When an employee is hired, the expectation is that the relationship is long term. For contractors, the relationship isn’t permanent. Instead, both parties enter the relationship with the assumption of a certain amount of time for the work to be completed.

When businesses wrongly classify their workers, they are still liable for the related taxes and payments for those workers, and may even face other sanctions. Correctly classifying your workers helps you avoid this, making it easier for you to run your business.

We know this stuff can be kind of confusing – and even scary. But don’t fear! We are here to help.. just ask!

 

Benchmarking: Part 2

In our latest blog post, we looked at why benchmarking is important for your business. Some of those reasons include:

  • It keeps you up to speed with real-time data (that is, as long as the data is timely, relevant, and accurate).
  • It never goes out of style and can be used continually, rather than a one-and-done solution.
  • It truly helps you understand the well-being of your business situation.

So now that we have a refresher of why benchmarking is great for your business, let’s dive in deeper. After you decide which data source you’ll use (make sure it’s accurate, timely and relevant), the challenge is now deciding which benchmarks to analyze and use as a tool for the success of your business.

We’ve said it before, but we will mention it again. Different industries, and different companies within an industry, might have different success measures. For example, a contractor might have large subcontractor expenditures. Are these expenses normal considering the contractor’s sales volume?

Instead of taking a look at industry-specific metrics, we’re going to focus on some metrics that are universally important and can provide a quick look into a company’s health.

  • Liquidity Ratios. Yes plural – because there are two that need to be analyzed together. They are:
    • Current Ratio which is shown as current assets divided by current liabilities. This metric shows general liquidity, but it does have some limitations. If inventory is included in calculating the current ratio, it might provide a distorted understanding of your cash flow.
    • Quick Ratio is expressed as cash accounts receivable divided by current liabilities. This ratio might not be perfect for showing liquidity, but it can be a useful and popular comparison to pair with the current ratio.
  • Net Profit Margin. Expressed as net-profit before taxes in a given period divided by sales. Another way to view this? How many cents of profit you extract from each dollar you earn in revenue. This might be a basic metric, but it’s extremely important!
  • Turnover Ratios. There are three ratios that you should consider:
    • Inventory Days which is shown as inventory divided by cost of goods sold, multiplied by 365 days. Inventory days tells the story of how long it takes to sell off inventory. However, it’s important to remember this ratio is very industry-specific. Imagine how long wine is stored in a winery compared to the length of time milk sits in a grocery store cooler. Usually, lower numbers are better.
    • Accounts Payable Ratio is expressed as accounts payable divided by cost of goods sold, multiplied by 365 days. The accounts payable ratio shows the number of days you take to pay the vendors. Higher numbers are better – it means you hold on to cash longer.
    • Accounts Receivable Ratio is shown as accounts receivable divided by sales, multiplied by 365 days. This is a rough measure of the number of days your company takes to turn accounts receivable to cash. You want lower numbers, as it is better to have cash in the bank than extra receivables on the books.

By paying attention to some of these important metrics, you can build a picture of where your business Is, where it should be going and what it will take to get there.

A Millennial’s View

Guest blog by: Isaac Bumgarden, audit intern, Eide Bailly LLP

Accountant: the career that seems like it’s filled with numbers nerds, gloomy days reading over spreadsheets and days spent typing away on a calculator. If we’re talking about a public accountant, everyone thinks you’re an evil number cruncher who’s up to no good (and maybe even works for the IRS).

So how does someone, let alone a millennial, decide accounting is the right career path?

As you know, everyone is different (yes, even us millennials have different tastes and interests). While I don’t speak for everyone, it seems a majority of millennials have a similar experience when it comes to choosing a career, especially if they landed on accounting. When looking at the accounting profession (at least before having much exposure to it), we tend to think of someone sitting behind a desk, quickly punching numbers into a calculator all day, or even someone working for the IRS – and often times, these views don’t seem to sit well with us millennials. After all, we are said to be a social generation which thrives off of each other.

However, college and schooling comes around, and a whole new world presents itself. Rather than hearing about the IRS auditors, you start learning about different options in the accounting world.

“A CFO? What’s that?”

            “There are other auditors besides the IRS? Well what’s the difference?”

           “I can open up my own tax accounting firm in my small home town if I                           understand this stuff?”

You begin to realize that maybe accounting isn’t a one-size-fits-all career path, and there might even be something about it that catches your eye. In fact, I see accounting as a door that leads to a lot of potential in the business world, which is something I never would have even thought of on my own.

Many of the potential scenarios in accounting appeal to us millennials if we are exposed to these options. If you enjoy being alone, maybe the traditional accounting job is for you. If you like interacting with people, take a look at the business side of accounting, such as being a CFO, where you get to go in and work alongside different companies. If travel is your idea of an ideal career, maybe an auditor is the right choice for you. There are many different opportunities and possibilities for each personality and skill set.

For myself (and other millennials, too) and even the general public, accounting is often seen as a boring profession, as explained before. However, accounting is so much more than just the numbers. Public accounting is not only a way to help individuals, but businesses as well.

Being an auditor allows you to help businesses be sure they are on the right track both legally and financially. If you’re the tax man (or woman), you can make sure individuals, families and businesses are being taxed properly, which can lead to saved money and greater revenue and income. Many people don’t realize accounting truly allows you to help people do what they love.

It seems the reason millennials aren’t choosing accounting as readily as other generations simply stems from the lack of information about what accounting really entails. When it comes to accounting, you’re never really stuck in one area. We millennials enjoy variety and a change in scenery, and accounting allows us to have just that.

Is it Time to Upgrade?

Accounting software is a great tool for your business. It helps you keep track of invoices, let’s you see where are your money is going and even allows you to access your information basically anytime, anywhere.

But if your accounting software is out of date, it actually might be doing more harm than good for your business. Here are some signs that it might be time to look into an updated system.

  • Are you still communicating with vendors and customers through email or even *gasp* snail mail? If so, it may be time to look for a system that provides an easier way to communicate.
  • If your desk is covered in papers and you have paper invoices and timecards coming out your ears, it’s time to stop endangering the tree population and look into a system that can do this electronically.
  • It might be time to look into some new software if your system doesn’t allow you to look at your information anytime, anywhere. This includes your cell phone – many systems allow you to have all of your information at the swipe of a finger.
  • Is your chart of accounts endless? Or, maybe you need to create a whole new set of accounts each time you add another profit or cost center (grants, jobs, products lines, etc.). Either way, both are major signs that it’s time to upgrade and update.
  • Your account system should do what you need it to, without you having to perform extra steps and work arounds. If your system is doing the exact opposite of its intended purpose, it’s time for something new.
  • If your vendor has completely stopped (or won’t be for much longer) supporting your software, you’ll need to upgrade. Although this sounds pretty obvious, we see this problem quite often!
  • It’s time to upgrade to a new system if you’re still using spreadsheets to track date and compute calculations. (Hint: accounting software does this for you!)
  • Here’s a big one. Do you enter manual journal entries – maybe you’ve even compiled them in your spreadsheets? Are you operating in several systems that don’t sync together? Time to get on board with a new, updated system!
  • Consider how much time you are devoting to closing the books each month. If you’re manually creating reports and manually completing the consolidation process, you’re wasting your time. An updated system can help you save your time to dedicate to other parts of your business.

If any of these common warning signs sound like something you are experiencing, now is probably a good time to start looking for new, updated accounting software. Although the transition won’t be easy, the benefits to your business will be worth it!

Have Questions? We have Answers

In our line of work, we get a lot of questions on anything and everything related to owning and operating a business (and we’re happy to answer them, too)! While a lot of these questions are usually pretty easy to answer, sometimes we get a few that really make us think. Even then, we enjoy researching and finding the answers to help business owners be successful.

So, what questions do you have about your business? We would love to help you reach your dreams and goals.

In case you think your question might be too far out there, we promise it’s not. Check out some of these questions (and our answers) to get you started on finding the information you need to watch your business succeed.

“I have invoices coming out of my ears! What do I do with all of them?”

When you have a large amount of invoices to deal with, it’s easy to get overwhelmed and lose track of what needs to get done. When invoices aren’t being properly managed, your business can see some serious negative side effects, such as fraud. Looking to an automated system, such as QuickBooks, is also a great way to keep your invoices at a manageable level.

“Where in the world did all of my cash go?”

This question is more common than you may think. While your business may be profitable, you can still be running out of cash, which might be a concern. Financial struggles can be hard, but our professionals are available to help. Check out this blog – and then, let’s talk!

“Why don’t I have enough time to do everything that needs to get done?”

We get it: owning and operating a business means you have a lot on your plate. From accounting and finance, to human resources to the day-to-day operations, you probably don’t have enough time to do it all yourself. The good news is you don’t have to! Consider your team of employees. What can you delegate to take some of the burden off your shoulders and free up some time? Another option is outsourcing. When you outsource some of your business activities, such as your accounting processes, you free up time to focus on why you got into business in the first place.

“What is this accrual accounting thing I hear so much about? Am I doing it?”

Knowing the specific ins and outs of accounting can be a confusing, daunting task. What it comes to what method of accounting you are using, the water may get even muddier. Maybe you’ve heard of cash based accounting and accrual accounting, but you really have no idea where to begin. We’ve written multiple blogs on how to tell the difference and how to select what fits your business and set up your books. Check them out!

“Taxes terrify me. Where do I even begin?”

Taxes are a complex issue, and questions regarding this topic are common. Whether you want to know more about R&D tax credits, employer vehicles and mileage, how to track your taxes or even all those pesky (yet necessary) forms, we’ve got you covered. Check out our tax archive for answers to all your most pressing questions. If you can’t find the answer, let us know.

Remember, although we numbers nerds really like our financial lingo, we promise to answer your questions in a way you will understand, not just a bunch of accountant talk. After all, we want to see your business succeed!