1099 Reminder

Way back in July, we taught you the basics of the 1099 forms. Now that the deadlines for these forms are coming into view, we thought we would give you some tips and helpful reminders for getting them filled out.

Wait, what are these for again?

The most common type of 1099, the 1099-MISC, needs to be completed for anyone who has provided services to you amounting to $600 or more. This can be anything from accounting services to snow removal – if it was $600 or greater worth of work, it goes on the 1099-MISC. However there are a few exceptions to the rule (go figure!). A 1099-MISC isn’t required if:

  • The company providing the services is incorporated – except with lawyers.
  • The person who provided services is your employee.
  • The amount of services provided is less than $600 worth.

Do I need to report anything else on the form?

The 1099-MISC requires you to report any rent paid to an individual or business that isn’t incorporated. It also requires you to report royalties of $10 or more and any other income payments such awards and prizes, and even employee wages paid after death. In other words, most miscellaneous payments are reported on the 1099-MISC.

Any other forms I should know about?

Another common 1099 is the 1099-INT. This form focuses on – you guessed it – interest reporting. Any interest paid amounting to $10 or more, any foreign tax and interest or backup federal withholdings – regardless of the interest payment amount — must be reported on this form.

So, when are they due?

Depending on the type of form you are filing, the due dates may vary. The IRS website gives a great picture of when each form is due. You can check it out here.

Anything else I should know before I get to work filling these out?

As always, these forms are more complex than meets the eye, and this list of items to include is not all-inclusive. Our pals at the IRS do a great job of explaining them, and we’ve also crafted a handy blog to help you get a picture of what these forms include.

We’re hopeful these reminders will give you the information (see what we did there?) you need to fill out the 1099. If your head is still spinning, let us know. We’re always here to help!

1099 Basics – In July

That’s right, it’s never too early to start the process of preparing your 1099s (you will thank us come January). Here are a few tips to start preparing those 1099s.

Who do I prepare 1099s for?

The simplest answer for the most common type of 1099, the 1099-MISC, is they need to be prepared for anyone that provided services to you. However, they are not given to someone who is an employee (here’s your refresh), and you need to have paid them $600 or more for the year (we’re talking accounting, legal, janitorial services, repairs, snow removal or lawn maintenance, etc. unless the company is incorporated). If the company is incorporated, then a 1099-MISC is not required, except with lawyers … then you still get to fill out the form.

Other items reported on a 1099-MISC include rent paid to an individual or a business that is not incorporated, royalties of $10 or more, other income payments including prizes and awards, employee wages paid after death in the year following death, director fees, etc.

Another common 1099 form is the 1099-INT. This form is required for interest paid of $10 or more, any foreign tax on interest withheld and paid, or backup federal withholdings regardless of the amount of the interest payment.

Please note, this is a very simplified list of items that 1099s need to be issued for. IRS.gov has several booklets that go into more detail on what is required and instructions for each form is available. On their website, type 1099 instructions in the search box and a list of forms and instructions will pop up.

So what am I supposed to do in July?

Identifying the vendors that need 1099s now will save you a lot of headache come year end. You can do this by having each of your vendors complete and return to you a Form W-9 (also found on IRS.gov). This form will give you their business name, address, tax identification number and type of entity. Best practice is to have all of your vendors complete this form, even if you know they will not be providing services to you. If circumstances change and you are required to provide a 1099 to them in another year, then you are already prepared!

Once the W-9s are returned, you can begin updating your records so when it comes time to complete your 1099s you will have the correct name, address, and TIN on file. You should also flag your vendors so it accumulates the amounts for you. Many accounting programs, such as QuickBooks, allow you to indicate the vendor will need a 1099 at the end of the year. Most also allow you to indicate the type of form and which box the amounts should be reported in. Having your system set up to accurately do the work for you will save tons of time at year end.

If all of these suggestions are followed, you should have time in January to put your feet up on your desk and relax because you won’t be spending hours trying to find vendor information and trying to figure out the amounts to report.

If you have questions, we’re always here to help.

Forms W2 & 1099: What You Need to Know

w2-bookAs 2017 begins, one of the things at the top of a business owners list is forms. Tax forms, to be more specific.

These forms are complex and take some time to go through. However, they’re necessary for your business for a multitude of reasons, one of which is not getting in trouble with the IRS.

Two of the most common tax forms you’ll get to deal with are the W-2 and 1099. These particular forms deal with reporting worker wages and income … and employees like to get paid.

Need a refresh on what they are? Check it out here and here.

To learn more about these important forms, and how to complete them correctly, check out our annual W2/1099 Book. In it, you’ll find:

  • Answers to who is an independent contractor and who is an employee
  • Information specific to the 1099
  • New Hire Reporting requirements and info
  • Information specific to Forms W-2 and W-3

Check out all the goodness here.

Taxes: When’s that due?

With the holiday season upon us, you’re probably thinking of the fun and festivities of the season and definitely not taxes.

Taxes? Why should you be thinking about taxes? Well, there have been some very important changes to tax due dates, and these deadlines will sneak up on you before you know it! Check out this infographic to see the deadlines so you’re not scrambling at the last minute!

tax-dates