Understanding Unclaimed Property

Unclaimed property has become a topic of increased discussion in recent years, especially as states conduct unclaimed property audits. Examples include:

As a business owner, it’s important to be aware of unclaimed property and the role your business plays, as well as how unclaimed property can impact your financial statements and cause reporting issues.

Let’s start at the beginning.

Unclaimed property is an unclaimed financial asset your company owes to another business or individual. This can include uncashed checks, inactive savings accounts, life insurance proceeds, customer overpayments and unused gift certificates.

Unclaimed property happens when a debt remains outstanding for a specific period of time. Typically this is one year or more, as specified by state statute.

For example, your organization issues a pay check to its employee. One of those employees never cashes that check. The paycheck has now become unclaimed property.

So what am I supposed to do?

Here’s the short answer: Give the asset back or turn it over to the state.

In the above example, you should reissue the check if you can locate the employee.

There are a few steps you need to take in order to properly deal with unclaimed property:

  1. Identify the dormant accounts
  2. Notify the property owners
  3. Remit the asset to the property owners or to the state

Identify the dormant accounts

The first step is to determine if you are a holder (company in possession of an asset that belongs to someone else). The best way to determine this is by setting up processes and procedures that allow you to identify where unclaimed property exists.

Some of the procedures include:

  • Follow up on outstanding checks and credits after six months
  • Require all transactions in and out of accounts have to go through review and approval
  • If you’re thinking about acquiring a company, make sure you research and are aware of potential unclaimed property exposure
  • Keep good records, including name, address, taxpayer identification number, etc.

Notify the property owners

The next step to take as the holder is to locate the property’s rightful owner. This is a process known as due diligence.

After this period of due diligence, the holder has to submit a report to the state, listing who you weren’t able to contact, as well as payment for those outstanding accounts.

Remit the asset

At this point, either the asset is turned over to the property owner, or it gets turned over to the state (known as escheatment). Once it’s turned over to the state, they now have responsibility for it. In other words, they hold it so it’s available to the recipient at a later time, should they come looking for it. If no one comes for it, the state keeps the unclaimed property.

As a reminder, unclaimed paychecks are considered unclaimed property and subject to escheatment. If you have an unclaimed paycheck, the unclaimed property laws of the state where the employee last worked apply.

What happens if I don’t do these things?

States have been increasing enforcement efforts. Plus, you can be audited in relation to unclaimed property. The states even have unclaimed property examiners that come in to assess unclaimed property exposure in businesses.

Just to make things more fun, there’s no statute of limitations, meaning the state agencies can come knocking at any time.

Any other tips?

  • Research the laws in your state and know the particulars of unclaimed property reporting by state.
  • Set up policies and procedures to ensure you have good records and are tracking potential unclaimed property concerns.
  • If you’re confused or just need extra help, contact your CPA or business advisor.




Things that Should Scare Small Business Owners

HalloweenWhen you’re running a business, there are a lot of things to consider. From payroll to people to marketing, you have a lot on your plate. In fact, we’re guessing there’s more than a few things that keep you up at night.

There are all sorts of scares lurking around the corner when it comes to owning and running a small to mid-sized business. Here are a few of the ones we find particularly frightening:

You hire without doing your research.

It’s true, you wear a lot of hats as a small business owner. It’s also true that quite a few of those hats are ones you don’t know anything about. Small business owners normally get into business because they have a dream to pursue, not to worry about the day-to-day details of running a business.

To solve that problem, you hire quickly for areas you don’t know anything about. Sounds good right? Not so fast …

  • Are they qualified? When you don’t know anything about the position you’re hiring for, you don’t know if the person (or consultant) is qualified to take on that role. For example, if you’re thinking about hiring someone to look at your financials, do you want a bookkeeper or a CFO? Or somewhere in between? There are several differences, including experience, duties and even pay.
  • How do you measure success? If you don’t know anything about the subject or position you’re hiring for, how do you measure success for that individual? How do you know your expectations and proposed timelines are reasonable?
  • Have you checked all the boxes when it comes to hiring? Another thing to consider is the entirety of the hiring process. Maybe you found the perfect candidate and you want them to start right away. But have you taken into account the necessary steps when it comes to hiring? There are several forms to fill out, items to consider and that pesky thing called onboarding. All of this has to be taken into account before you make that hire.

We’re all for hiring (whether it’s an employee or a consultant) to help you run your business. Just make sure you do the research and know what you want and need in order to help your business run more effectively.

You don’t take your financials seriously.

Having up-to-date, accurate financials is of paramount importance. If you don’t, you’re in for a world of hurt. Without it, you don’t know how much money you’re making (or losing), nor can you even begin to understand the basic state of your business.

Further, you won’t be able to make strategic business decisions and set a course for the future of your business. Plus, financial information is pretty important to creditors, investors and buyers.

Only 40% of small businesses say they are “extremely” or “very knowledgeable” in accounting and finance. (source)

Bookkeeping is not as simple as just throwing numbers into a spreadsheet. You need to understand basic accounting terminology in order to make informed decisions. For instance, just because your books say there’s money coming in, doesn’t mean you’re in the clear. Cash flow and profit are two different things.

The solution? Invest in accurately tracking your business financials. Find a consultant or hire an accountant (once you’ve done your research) who can help you navigate your current situation and also look out for potential pitfalls.

You don’t have accountability.

Success matters to small businesses, especially in the early stages of your company. But what does success mean? Can you define it in a measurable way? Can your employees?

Businesses work when roles are defined and individuals understand their performance expectations. That’s why it’s important to have KPIs (key performance indicators) in place for your company and your employees.

It’s here where we remind you that KPIs are quantifiable measurements for critical success. Quantifiable is key as it helps you track progress and whether or not you’re accomplishing your goals. If you’re not tracking, then you have no idea if it’s working or if you need to find ways to improve.

You don’t value your product … or yourself.

Let’s start with the basics … one of the keys to starting a business is that you have a product or service people actually want. Once you’ve got that, the next step is pricing it effectively.

Often, business owners play the cheapest option game to get their product into the market. This path undermines the real value of your product. Plus, it’s a lot of work to come back from under pricing your product.

Take the time, instead, to do some market research and really find a price point that shows the value of your product and also allows for market entry. Also, ensure the price point you’ve chosen will help your business financially … which is why it helps to have up-to-date financial information from the beginning.

But let’s not forget about YOU. In addition to your product’s value, you have value as the business owner. At the beginning you’re trying to do it all. It’s important to realize when you’re in too deep and you need help.

“Your new venture demands that every aspect is handled by someone who understands what they’re doing. And no amount of good intention will turn an IT specialist into a good bookkeeper.” (source)

The moral of the story here is to value yourself. Value your time, know your strengths and why you got into business. Let someone whose passion is for numbers or marketing or HR or whatever the subject may be handle the tasks you need done. And remember, if you don’t want to hire someone full time, you can always outsource it.

You’re not playing by the rules.

To say there are more than a few updates to rules and regulations affecting small businesses each year would be an understatement. Did you know, for instance, the General Services Administration annually updates the federal maximum per diem rates? This update would affect any business that has employees travel for work.

Or did you know that several states and cities are now introducing mandatory paid sick leave policies? If you have workers, your policies (if your business is in any of the affected areas) will have to align with this new ruling.

These are just a few examples of the rules and updates small business owners face on a regular basis. Many of these rules directly affect your financials, how you report information about your company and its customers and the benefits and rights your employees get.

That’s why it’s important to know what’s going on and ensure you’re in compliance. Find a consultant who can stay on top of these updates and regulations and ensure your business is following the rules.







Meet the Team: Sandy Kundert

124What is my role? My role is to ensure our clients are getting the best possible Eide Bailly experience they can. I do this by making sure we understand what our clients need, what they wish for and suggesting things they may not have thought of. Then we try to match a member of our team with the client. If our clients are successful, then we are successful!

Why are numbers important for business? Numbers are like lab test results from the doctor. They not only show us the current health of the business but aid in what we need to do in order to improve over time. Good decisions come from being informed and numbers do just that.

Why do I want you to succeed? I have several clients I have worked with for many years. You get to know each other on a personal level and they become like family. I always feel a little pride when my clients have a win, no matter how big or small and I’m thankful they let me be a part of that.

#ILoveSmallBiz – Whether a small business succeeds or fails, it has a huge impact on their employees, customers, and the local economy. By helping small businesses succeed, we all become winners.

Setting up for Success: Part 2

Welcome to our “Setting up for Success: Part 2” blog post. Part one focused on selecting a basis for your accounting and determining what information you need to track in your business.

Now that you understand what you need to track, how do you track this important information?

You can start by developing your chart of accounts. We know what you’re thinking: “develop my what?!”

Your chart of accounts is a listing of accounts that are needed to prepare financial statements and reports. A typical structure looks like this:

1000-1999 Assets

            2000-2999 Liabilities 

            3000-3999 Equity

            4000-4999 Sales

            5000-5999 Cost of Goods Sold (COGS)

            6000-6999 Operating Expenses (General and Administrative)

            7000-7999 Other Income and Expense

            8000-8999 Income Tax Expense

Account numbered 1000-3999 are used in preparing the balance sheet, while numbers 4000-8999 are used in preparing the income statement, which focuses on profit and loss. Of course, the number of individual accounts within each category will depend on the specific needs of your business.

A good rule to keep practice is to try to use the least number of accounts to attain the financial information you need, and structure it for growth.

What do we mean by growth? Let’s take a closer look at the assets section:

1000 Petty Cash

            1005 Checking

            1010 Savings

            1100 Accounts Receivable

            1200 Inventory

            1300 Prepaid Expenses

            1400 Fixed Assets

            1450 Accumulated Depreciation

You probably noticed the account numbers aren’t in sequential order. This allows for room for growth in your business.

You can also use the chart of accounts to track different jobs, departments, segments, etc. For example, maybe your business has locations across the Midwest in Fargo, Minneapolis and Sioux Falls. You want to be able to see how profitable you are at each location. You can track each location by assigning a division number, such as 01-Fargo, 02-Minneapolis, 03-Sioux Falls, and then attaching each division number to each of the accounts, like this:

            4000-01 Sales

            4000-02 Sales

            4000-03 Sales

            5000-01 COGS

            5000-02 COGS

            5000-03 COGS

Now that you know what information you need and how to track it, you can select an accounting system to help you track and keep information in order.

There are two options for tracking your information: manually or electronically (think desktop or cloud based). While there is no right or wrong way, computerized accounting is usually more efficient, which is leading to manual accounting becoming a dinosaur in today’s accounting world. Cloud based accounting also gives you the freedom to access your information anytime, anywhere. Who doesn’t love simplicity and accessibility?

It’s important, as always, to remember that each business is different, so accounting systems usually aren’t one size fits all. Doing your research and truly understanding your business’ needs can help you select a system that gives you the best possible results.

If all of this seems overwhelming, fear not. We have the resources and talent to help you design an accounting system that can set your business up for success.

Three Components You Can’t Ignore

Like you, your business is alive. But is it thriving? Are you giving it the fuel it needs to grow?

Many components of business require the time of owners, founders and management. And three critical components stand out—accounting, culture and systems. Sure, it’s possible to make money without these, but it can be extremely difficult to grow or reach goals. Surprisingly, these three components are typically ignored or left to chance. Don’t leave your success to chance.

Accounting, culture and systems are equally important, although one might take priority over the other two, depending on your business and its current development stage. But no matter where you’re at, it’s important to be aware of how these three components contribute to your progress.


Accounting is usually most ignored by small and beginning businesses. However, we’ve seen many well established, profitable companies that don’t have or can’t produce reliable financials on demand. Without that, management loses all ability to gain valuable information that’s provided in financial statements.

So, why is accounting often ignored? While each business likely has its own, unique reasons, there are some common themes we see. Often times, small businesses just can’t afford to have in house accounting people, so these functions get pushed to the back burner. Another common theme we see stems from lack of understanding. Accounting can be tricky, and when businesses don’t understand their numbers, they often times just ignore them and hope for the best. This can lead to some serious financial issues that, if ignored, can take a business downhill fast.


Culture is your company’s personality. It’s how your staff interacts with each other and customers. If you don’t identify and define your culture, you can stunt your business’s efforts to grow. For example, one business owner almost completely replaced her staff. Her former staff wanted to keep the “mom and pop” feel. In her long-range planning, which her former staff was part of, they identified strategies for growing the business, complete with revenue targets. It wasn’t until the owner began taking the necessary action to achieve the growth did she realize her staff wasn’t actually on board. Her views of change and growth for the company differed from her staff, which created a cultural nightmare.

It is imperative for everyone to believe and share the company culture. Maybe this means creating policies and procedures that directly align with your company culture, or hosting meetings and events to help your staff understand and adapt to the company culture. However you implement it, culture is too important to ignore – after all, your people are at the heart of your business.


Proper systems are more than writing down the process. The systems should be both quantifiable and qualified. Quantifiable means it should be set up to measure if things are being done the same way every time, and if the desired results are being achieved. A qualified system is one that’s performed the same way and the way it was written, even if you or management is not present. It should be pointed out that it’s not necessary to systematize your entire business. Focus on areas that create consistent and reoccurring frustrations, are important to the operation and growth of the business and where consistent results are needed.

To sum it all up, all components of your business are important. Your accounting needs, culture and systems and processes are three components that stand out because unfortunately, they are often ignored. By devoting more time, effort and resources into these, you can help your business stay on track for growth and continued success.

*Shameless plug: These three components may seem confusing, scary and downright challenging, but it doesn’t have to be that way. We have talented professionals who dedicate their time and skills to helping your business succeed. If you need help, let us know!

When it Comes to Accounting, Communication is Key

By: Kristie Rants, Eide Bailly LLP

We get it: the thought of sitting down and talking with your accountant might be a little scary. After all, all they do all day is sit and stare at numbers and do math, and their jargon and lingo is hard, if not impossible, to understand, right?

Not exactly.

While the thought of having conversations with your accountant might be intimidating, it really shouldn’t be. More often than not, your friendly number cruncher wants to talk to you, too (and we promise to use words that make sense)!

To help the conversation go smoothly, we came up with some tips to help you have successful conversations with your accountant.

Communication is key

  • First and foremost: figure out the best method for communicating with your accountant. Whether it’s in person, email or even Skype, agree on what works best for both of you.
  • Decide on frequency for communicating. Some businesses may need to have meetings weekly, while others may be on a monthly schedule. This is usually driven by business needs.
  • Make sure you’re both on the same page. It’s important that your accountant understands your business, just as you should be able to understand what they’re talking about. If you are unsure about the topic being discussed, don’t nod your head – ask more questions!
  • Establish a relationship. Create an environment where both you and your accountant are comfortable with each other. When you have a solid relationship with your accountant, it’s often easier to ask whatever is on your mind, no matter how basic it may seem.


Be prepared

  • Come prepared to each meeting. Make sure you have organized and complete information to share. If you’re not sure what exactly to bring, ask your accountant. He or she can give you a list of documents and information that might be needed.
  • Be prepared to share any changes occurring in your business. This keeps your accountant in the know and decreases the likelihood of any unwanted surprises in the future.
  • Ask questions throughout the year and as they arise rather than holding them all in. It’s easier to remember and examine information right away, rather than waiting six months down the road.
  • If your accountant sends out newsletters, articles, etc., read them! These often contain current and important information that can impact your business. If your accountant thinks it’s important, you should give it a read as well.

Accountants wear many hats

  • Your accountant likely has access to many resources to help you with any phase of your business. Your accountant can do all sorts of tax planning, whether you’re interested in putting away additional money in a retirement plan or wondering what your options are for depreciating equipment. Maybe a cost segregation study to accelerate depreciation or a 179d study makes sense for you!
  • Accountants can even help train you or your staff. Ask them if they offer an on-site service. Sometimes a few hours of training makes all of the difference. (Shameless plug: our accounting coach services do just that)!
  • Consider what stage your business is in. If you’re thinking about selling (or buying) or even retiring, your accountant can likely help you or introduce you to someone who can get you on the right track for a successful transition. They have the expertise to help you succeed.

The moral of the story…

Communicating with accountants can seem intimidating and confusing. Using these tips can help you have successful conversations. If you’re still intimidated, reach out. We promise to help you understand the accounting side of your business so you can get back to doing what you love.

Meet the Team: Stephanie Berggren

StephWhat is my role? My role is to help business owners by sharing and teaching what I love – accounting. Owners can focus on the fun stuff, like making their business grow, while my team and I can provide the accounting skills and knowledge to help them make smart growth decisions. My team and I can help them interpret the story the numbers are telling so they can have a better understanding of where their business is and where it’s going.

Why are numbers important for business?  Numbers are the story of your business. They tell the owner important statistics that, when understood and applied correctly, can help the business owner make informed decisions. Numbers tell the business owner what works and what doesn’t.

Why do I want you to succeed? When you succeed, we all succeed. I love the feeling of seeing businesses I worked with become successful. It develops a sense of pride in what I’ve accomplished, but also makes me excited to see where your business will go next!

#ILoveSmallBiz – Small businesses truly make the world go round. From job opportunities to innovative ideas, small businesses provide success and growth opportunities for our communities, which is a win-win for everyone.