Forms, forms and more forms

There are many forms to remember as part of owning a business. There are forms to document employee wages, forms for contractors, forms for donated vehicles, forms for acquisitions … the list goes on and on.

Understanding what each form is, and which ones you need to fill out, is an important aspect of your business. Today we’re breaking down some of the most common information return forms and what gets reported on them.

First we’ll start with a definition. An information return is a tax document businesses use to let the IRS know about transactions. These forms are mandatory, meaning you don’t get a choice in filling them out and reporting your transactions to the IRS.

Now on to the forms …

 

Form W-2

The W-2 is also known as the wage and tax statement. It should be pretty familiar as it is used to document wages, tips and other compensation, Medicare, Social Security, income tax withholdings and more for each of your employees.

Every employer in a trade or business with employees who are compensated for their work needs to fill out the Form W-2 for them. If income, social security or Medicare tax was withheld, you get to fill out this form for your employees.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31, for federal and most states
  • To IRS: January 31both e-file and paper copies

 

Form W-2G

Form W-2G is a specific form used for gambling winnings and losses. You will need to file a W-2G if you receive:

  • $600 or more in gambling winnings (if the payout is at least 300 times the amount of the wager)
  • $1,200 or more in winnings from bingo or slot machines
  • $1,500 or more from keno
  • More than $5,000 from a poker tournament

As a friendly reminder, all gambling winnings are subject to income tax.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099 Series

The Form 1099 series is a group of forms used to report ordinary kinds of payments, such as dividends, interest, retirement distributions and miscellaneous income payments.

Form 1099-MISC

Form 1099-MISC is filed by a business for payments made to nonemployees who do work for your business or trade. In other words, if they’re not an employee, but you’re paying them for a service, you have to report it on Form 1099-MISC.

Form 1099-MISC is required for each person you’ve made payments to based on the following criteria:

  • $10 or more in royalties or broker payments in lieu of dividends or tax-exempt interest
  • $600 or more in rents, services, prizes and awards, other income payments, medical and health care payments, crop insurance proceeds, cash payments for fish you purchase or cash paid from notional principal contract to an individual, partnership or estate
  • Any fish boat proceeds
  • Gross proceeds to an attorney
  • Direct sales of at least $5,000 of consumer products to a buyer for resale anywhere other than a permanent retail establishment
  • Any backup withholding regardless of the amount

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31, for federal and most states
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically) or January 31 (if any payments for nonemployee compensation are reported in box 7)

 

Form 1099-DIV

This form is used for dividends and distributions. Specifically it’s filed for each person for whom you’ve:

  • Paid dividends and other distributions on stock of $10 or more
  • Withheld or paid any foreign tax on dividends and other distributions of stock
  • Withheld any federal income tax under the backup withholding rules
  • Paid $600 or more as part of a liquidation

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-INT

The Interest Income form is used for reporting interest payments when:

  • Interest of $10 or more is paid or credited on earnings
  • Interest of $600 or more from other sources in the course of trade or business
  • Forfeited interest due to premature withdrawals of time deposits
  • Federal backup withholding and foreign tax withholding and paid on interest
  • Payments of any interest to bearers of certificates of deposit

This form is specifically for interest payments made in the course of your trade or business, including federal, state and local government agencies.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-OID

Form 1099-OID is also known as the Original Issue Discount. It’s used when you purchase a bond for lesser price than the face value or principle amount. This discount is given instead of a bond earning interest. If you purchase a bond for less the face value, you should receive a Form 1099-OID, which is where you report $10 or more in gross income from that bond.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-R

This form is used to report any distribution of $10 or more form pension sharing or retirement plans, any individual retirement arrangements, annuities, pensions, insurance contracts, etc. It’s also used to report death benefit payments made by you as the employer that are not part of a pension, profit-sharing or retirement plan.

The fun part about Form 1099-R is that there are nine numeric codes and 18 alpha codes to use when reporting amounts in box 7 of the form. For more information on these, and what to put in what box, check out our W2/1099 ebook.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-PATR

This form is specific to cooperatives and must be filled out if $10 or more in distributions paid from the cooperative is passed through to their patrons. This includes any domestic production activities deduction and certain pass-through credits.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-LTC

This form is used if you pay any long-term care benefits, including accelerated death benefits. Payers include insurance companies, governmental units and viatical settlement providers.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-SA

Here we’re looking at reporting distributions made from an HSA, Archer MSA or Medicare Advantage MSA. Form 1099-SA can be used if the distribution is paid directly to a medical service provider or to the account holder. A separate return has to be filed for each plan type.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-A

Also known as the Acquisition or Abandonment of Secured Property, Form 1099-A is used for each borrower you lend money to in connection with your trade or business. Specifically, this applies to the full or partial satisfaction of a debt.

Deadline:

  • To borrower: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-C

Use this form for each debtor for whom debt of $600 or more was cancelled. Specifically, you must file Form 1099-C if:

  • You are a financial institution
  • A credit union
  • A corporation that is a subsidiary of a financial institution or credit union
  • A federal government agency
  • An organization whose significant trade or business is the lending of money

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-B

Form 1099-B is specifically for a broker or barter exchange. It must be filled out for each person for whom the broker:

  • Sold stocks, bonds commodities, regulated future contracts, foreign currency contracts, debt instruments, etc. for cash
  • Received cash, stock or other property from a corporation that the broker knows had stock acquired in an acquisition
  • Exchanged property or services through a barter exchange

Deadline:

  • To recipient: February 15
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-K

This one is specific to a payment settlement entity (PSE) for payments made in settlement of reportable payment transactions within the calendar year.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-Q

Form 1099-Q is used for payments from qualified education programs. Specifically, you must file this form if you’re an officer or employee having control of a program established by an eligible educational institution and have made a distribution from a qualified tuition program.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1042-S

This form is used to report income subject to withholding paid to nonresident aliens, foreign partnerships, foreign corporations or nonresident alien or foreign fiduciaries of estates or trusts.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: March 15
  • To IRS: March 15

 

The moral of the story

This is a high level overview of just some of the information returns that exist. It’s important to understand what forms apply to your organization and what information to report on each form. To learn more, check out our W2/1099 year end planning book or contact your business advisor.

 

 

1099 Reminder

Way back in July, we taught you the basics of the 1099 forms. Now that the deadlines for these forms are coming into view, we thought we would give you some tips and helpful reminders for getting them filled out.

Wait, what are these for again?

The most common type of 1099, the 1099-MISC, needs to be completed for anyone who has provided services to you amounting to $600 or more. This can be anything from accounting services to snow removal – if it was $600 or greater worth of work, it goes on the 1099-MISC. However there are a few exceptions to the rule (go figure!). A 1099-MISC isn’t required if:

  • The company providing the services is incorporated – except with lawyers.
  • The person who provided services is your employee.
  • The amount of services provided is less than $600 worth.

Do I need to report anything else on the form?

The 1099-MISC requires you to report any rent paid to an individual or business that isn’t incorporated. It also requires you to report royalties of $10 or more and any other income payments such awards and prizes, and even employee wages paid after death. In other words, most miscellaneous payments are reported on the 1099-MISC.

Any other forms I should know about?

Another common 1099 is the 1099-INT. This form focuses on – you guessed it – interest reporting. Any interest paid amounting to $10 or more, any foreign tax and interest or backup federal withholdings – regardless of the interest payment amount — must be reported on this form.

So, when are they due?

Depending on the type of form you are filing, the due dates may vary. The IRS website gives a great picture of when each form is due. You can check it out here.

Anything else I should know before I get to work filling these out?

As always, these forms are more complex than meets the eye, and this list of items to include is not all-inclusive. Our pals at the IRS do a great job of explaining them, and we’ve also crafted a handy blog to help you get a picture of what these forms include.

We’re hopeful these reminders will give you the information (see what we did there?) you need to fill out the 1099. If your head is still spinning, let us know. We’re always here to help!

1099 Basics – In July

That’s right, it’s never too early to start the process of preparing your 1099s (you will thank us come January). Here are a few tips to start preparing those 1099s.

Who do I prepare 1099s for?

The simplest answer for the most common type of 1099, the 1099-MISC, is they need to be prepared for anyone that provided services to you. However, they are not given to someone who is an employee (here’s your refresh), and you need to have paid them $600 or more for the year (we’re talking accounting, legal, janitorial services, repairs, snow removal or lawn maintenance, etc. unless the company is incorporated). If the company is incorporated, then a 1099-MISC is not required, except with lawyers … then you still get to fill out the form.

Other items reported on a 1099-MISC include rent paid to an individual or a business that is not incorporated, royalties of $10 or more, other income payments including prizes and awards, employee wages paid after death in the year following death, director fees, etc.

Another common 1099 form is the 1099-INT. This form is required for interest paid of $10 or more, any foreign tax on interest withheld and paid, or backup federal withholdings regardless of the amount of the interest payment.

Please note, this is a very simplified list of items that 1099s need to be issued for. IRS.gov has several booklets that go into more detail on what is required and instructions for each form is available. On their website, type 1099 instructions in the search box and a list of forms and instructions will pop up.

So what am I supposed to do in July?

Identifying the vendors that need 1099s now will save you a lot of headache come year end. You can do this by having each of your vendors complete and return to you a Form W-9 (also found on IRS.gov). This form will give you their business name, address, tax identification number and type of entity. Best practice is to have all of your vendors complete this form, even if you know they will not be providing services to you. If circumstances change and you are required to provide a 1099 to them in another year, then you are already prepared!

Once the W-9s are returned, you can begin updating your records so when it comes time to complete your 1099s you will have the correct name, address, and TIN on file. You should also flag your vendors so it accumulates the amounts for you. Many accounting programs, such as QuickBooks, allow you to indicate the vendor will need a 1099 at the end of the year. Most also allow you to indicate the type of form and which box the amounts should be reported in. Having your system set up to accurately do the work for you will save tons of time at year end.

If all of these suggestions are followed, you should have time in January to put your feet up on your desk and relax because you won’t be spending hours trying to find vendor information and trying to figure out the amounts to report.

If you have questions, we’re always here to help.

Taxes: When’s that due?

With the holiday season upon us, you’re probably thinking of the fun and festivities of the season and definitely not taxes.

Taxes? Why should you be thinking about taxes? Well, there have been some very important changes to tax due dates, and these deadlines will sneak up on you before you know it! Check out this infographic to see the deadlines so you’re not scrambling at the last minute!

tax-dates

Year-End Planning: Form 1099

Now that you’ve become an expert in filling out your W-2s correctly (still not quite sure? Here you go!), it’s time to talk about another type of FORM. Get excited.

Form 1099

Businesses make certain payments to nonemployees during a calendar year. When they do this (you guessed it), they must furnish annual information returns both to the IRS and to the nonemployee recipient of the payment.

As a reminder, an information return is a document used for reporting purposes based on certain transactions incurred throughout the year. Information on these forms is used to assist both the taxpayer (you and the nonemployee party) in preparing to file taxes, as well as the IRS to match records to the taxpayer’s tax return.

In order to facilitate the reporting of these payments, IRS has developed the Form 1099 Series, which is a group of forms used to report ordinary kinds of payments made by a business, such as dividends, interest, retirement distributions, and miscellaneous income payments.

Wait … what?

While W-2 reports wages, salaries and tips, Form 1099-MISC, “Miscellaneous Income” is filed by a business for certain payments made to nonemployees (remember the difference?) in the course of trade or business.

What exactly does trade or business mean?

Trade or business generally refers to an entity that operates for gain or profit. However, it’s not that simple. Nonprofit organizations are also subject to these reporting requirements. Other organizations/items subject to the reporting requirement also include:

  • Trusts of qualified pension or profit-sharing plans of employers
  • Certain organizations exempt from tax under section 501(c) or (d)
  • Farmers’ cooperatives exempt from tax under section 521
  • Widely held investment trusts
  • Payments made by federal, state or local governments

When is Form 1099-Misc required exactly?

Form 1099 is required in a number of circumstances, including:

  • $10 or more in royalties or broker payments in lieu of dividends or tax–exempt interest;
  • $600 or more in:
    • Rent
    • Services, including parts and materials
    • Prizes and awards
    • Other income payments
    • Medical and health care payments
    • Crop insurance proceeds
    • Cash payments for fish you purchase from anyone engaged in the trade or business of catching fish (we’re not kidding)
    • The cash paid from notional principal contract to an individual, partnership, or estate
  • Any fish boat proceeds (again, not making this up)
  • Gross proceeds to an attorney
  • Reporting of direct sales of at least $5000 of consumer products to a buyer for resale anywhere other than a permanent retail establishment
  • Any backup withholding regardless of the amount of payment.

This form is seriously required? 

Yep! The form is required for each person to whom payments have been made during the year.

So everyone has to fill this thing out?

Not quite. There are certain payments where Forms 1099 are not required:

  • Generally payments to a corporation
  • Payments for merchandise telegrams (yes, it’s a thing), telephone, freight, storage and similar items
  • Payments of rent to real estate agents
  • Wages paid to employees (report on Form W-2. Learn more about that one here)
    • Other items not included on Forms 1099, but are included on W-2:
      • Military differential wage payments made to employees while they are on active duty in the Armed forces or other uniformed services
      • Business travel allowances paid to employee (may be reportable on W-2)
      • Cost of current life insurance protection (report on Form W-2 or Form 1099-R, Distributions from Pensions, Annuities, Retirement, or Profit-Sharing plans, IRAs, Insurance Contracts, etc.)
  • Payments to a tax-exempt organization including tax-exempt trusts (IRAs, HSAs, Archer MSAs, and Coverdell ESAs), the United States, a state, the District of Columbia, a U.S. possession, or a foreign government
  • Payments made to or for homeowners from the HFA Hardest Hit Fund or the Emergency Homeowners’ Loan Program or similar state program.
  • Payments made with a credit card or payment card and certain other types of payments, including third party network transactions
    • These ones go on a different form, known as the Form 1099K
  • A payment to an informer as an award, fee, or reward for information about criminal activity
    • Yep, you don’t have to fill this form out if you were being a good Samaritan, as long as the payment is made by a federal, state, or local government agency, or by a nonprofit organization exempt from tax under section 501(c)(3) that makes the payment to further the charitable purpose of lessening the burdens of government.
  • Scholarship or fellowship grants. Why, you might ask. Well scholarship or fellowship grants are taxable to the recipient because they are paid for teaching, research, or other services as a condition for receiving the grant.
    • So where might this one go? If you guessed W-2, you’re exactly right. They are considered wages and must be reported on Form W-2. Other taxable scholarships or fellowship payments (to a degree or non-degree candidate) are not required to be reported to the IRS on any form.
  • Difficulty-of-care payments that are excludable from the recipient’s gross income are not required to be reported. Difficulty-of-care payments to foster care providers are not reportable if paid for not more than 11 children under age 19 and not more than six individuals age 19 or older.
  • A canceled debt is not reportable on Form 1099-MISC. That one goes on a different form (yes, there really are a lot of forms), known as Form 1099-C.

This makes NO SENSE. Head hurts.

Tax reporting is complex and multi-faceted. This stuff isn’t easy and, frankly, stumps quite a few of us (and we’re accountants). So don’t be afraid to ask.