1099 Reminder

Way back in July, we taught you the basics of the 1099 forms. Now that the deadlines for these forms are coming into view, we thought we would give you some tips and helpful reminders for getting them filled out.

Wait, what are these for again?

The most common type of 1099, the 1099-MISC, needs to be completed for anyone who has provided services to you amounting to $600 or more. This can be anything from accounting services to snow removal – if it was $600 or greater worth of work, it goes on the 1099-MISC. However there are a few exceptions to the rule (go figure!). A 1099-MISC isn’t required if:

  • The company providing the services is incorporated – except with lawyers.
  • The person who provided services is your employee.
  • The amount of services provided is less than $600 worth.

Do I need to report anything else on the form?

The 1099-MISC requires you to report any rent paid to an individual or business that isn’t incorporated. It also requires you to report royalties of $10 or more and any other income payments such awards and prizes, and even employee wages paid after death. In other words, most miscellaneous payments are reported on the 1099-MISC.

Any other forms I should know about?

Another common 1099 is the 1099-INT. This form focuses on – you guessed it – interest reporting. Any interest paid amounting to $10 or more, any foreign tax and interest or backup federal withholdings – regardless of the interest payment amount — must be reported on this form.

So, when are they due?

Depending on the type of form you are filing, the due dates may vary. The IRS website gives a great picture of when each form is due. You can check it out here.

Anything else I should know before I get to work filling these out?

As always, these forms are more complex than meets the eye, and this list of items to include is not all-inclusive. Our pals at the IRS do a great job of explaining them, and we’ve also crafted a handy blog to help you get a picture of what these forms include.

We’re hopeful these reminders will give you the information (see what we did there?) you need to fill out the 1099. If your head is still spinning, let us know. We’re always here to help!

Things that Should Scare Small Business Owners

HalloweenWhen you’re running a business, there are a lot of things to consider. From payroll to people to marketing, you have a lot on your plate. In fact, we’re guessing there’s more than a few things that keep you up at night.

There are all sorts of scares lurking around the corner when it comes to owning and running a small to mid-sized business. Here are a few of the ones we find particularly frightening:

You hire without doing your research.

It’s true, you wear a lot of hats as a small business owner. It’s also true that quite a few of those hats are ones you don’t know anything about. Small business owners normally get into business because they have a dream to pursue, not to worry about the day-to-day details of running a business.

To solve that problem, you hire quickly for areas you don’t know anything about. Sounds good right? Not so fast …

  • Are they qualified? When you don’t know anything about the position you’re hiring for, you don’t know if the person (or consultant) is qualified to take on that role. For example, if you’re thinking about hiring someone to look at your financials, do you want a bookkeeper or a CFO? Or somewhere in between? There are several differences, including experience, duties and even pay.
  • How do you measure success? If you don’t know anything about the subject or position you’re hiring for, how do you measure success for that individual? How do you know your expectations and proposed timelines are reasonable?
  • Have you checked all the boxes when it comes to hiring? Another thing to consider is the entirety of the hiring process. Maybe you found the perfect candidate and you want them to start right away. But have you taken into account the necessary steps when it comes to hiring? There are several forms to fill out, items to consider and that pesky thing called onboarding. All of this has to be taken into account before you make that hire.

We’re all for hiring (whether it’s an employee or a consultant) to help you run your business. Just make sure you do the research and know what you want and need in order to help your business run more effectively.

You don’t take your financials seriously.

Having up-to-date, accurate financials is of paramount importance. If you don’t, you’re in for a world of hurt. Without it, you don’t know how much money you’re making (or losing), nor can you even begin to understand the basic state of your business.

Further, you won’t be able to make strategic business decisions and set a course for the future of your business. Plus, financial information is pretty important to creditors, investors and buyers.

Only 40% of small businesses say they are “extremely” or “very knowledgeable” in accounting and finance. (source)

Bookkeeping is not as simple as just throwing numbers into a spreadsheet. You need to understand basic accounting terminology in order to make informed decisions. For instance, just because your books say there’s money coming in, doesn’t mean you’re in the clear. Cash flow and profit are two different things.

The solution? Invest in accurately tracking your business financials. Find a consultant or hire an accountant (once you’ve done your research) who can help you navigate your current situation and also look out for potential pitfalls.

You don’t have accountability.

Success matters to small businesses, especially in the early stages of your company. But what does success mean? Can you define it in a measurable way? Can your employees?

Businesses work when roles are defined and individuals understand their performance expectations. That’s why it’s important to have KPIs (key performance indicators) in place for your company and your employees.

It’s here where we remind you that KPIs are quantifiable measurements for critical success. Quantifiable is key as it helps you track progress and whether or not you’re accomplishing your goals. If you’re not tracking, then you have no idea if it’s working or if you need to find ways to improve.

You don’t value your product … or yourself.

Let’s start with the basics … one of the keys to starting a business is that you have a product or service people actually want. Once you’ve got that, the next step is pricing it effectively.

Often, business owners play the cheapest option game to get their product into the market. This path undermines the real value of your product. Plus, it’s a lot of work to come back from under pricing your product.

Take the time, instead, to do some market research and really find a price point that shows the value of your product and also allows for market entry. Also, ensure the price point you’ve chosen will help your business financially … which is why it helps to have up-to-date financial information from the beginning.

But let’s not forget about YOU. In addition to your product’s value, you have value as the business owner. At the beginning you’re trying to do it all. It’s important to realize when you’re in too deep and you need help.

“Your new venture demands that every aspect is handled by someone who understands what they’re doing. And no amount of good intention will turn an IT specialist into a good bookkeeper.” (source)

The moral of the story here is to value yourself. Value your time, know your strengths and why you got into business. Let someone whose passion is for numbers or marketing or HR or whatever the subject may be handle the tasks you need done. And remember, if you don’t want to hire someone full time, you can always outsource it.

You’re not playing by the rules.

To say there are more than a few updates to rules and regulations affecting small businesses each year would be an understatement. Did you know, for instance, the General Services Administration annually updates the federal maximum per diem rates? This update would affect any business that has employees travel for work.

Or did you know that several states and cities are now introducing mandatory paid sick leave policies? If you have workers, your policies (if your business is in any of the affected areas) will have to align with this new ruling.

These are just a few examples of the rules and updates small business owners face on a regular basis. Many of these rules directly affect your financials, how you report information about your company and its customers and the benefits and rights your employees get.

That’s why it’s important to know what’s going on and ensure you’re in compliance. Find a consultant who can stay on top of these updates and regulations and ensure your business is following the rules.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Importance of Classifying Workers

Recently, the IRS released a fact sheet to help remind small businesses of the importance of correctly classifying workers. Sometimes IRS lingo can be complicated, so we broke it down for you.

Let’s start with the question that’s probably going through your head – why does this matter?

When you classify your workers, this can help determine if you need to withhold income, social security and Medicare taxes. It also helps determine if you actually have to pay these taxes on employee wages. When it comes to independent contractors, businesses usually don’t have to withhold or pay taxes. If you’re not classifying correctly, you can get stuck with some harsh fines and penalties.

So how do you determine if the individual is an independent contractor or an employee? One general rule to follow is that your worker is an independent contractor if the business has the right to control only the result of the work, not how the work will be done. However, there are three categories that can help you make your determination.

Behavioral Control

A worker is considered an employee when the business gets to be bossy. Okay, maybe bossy isn’t the right word, but the business does have the right to direct and control the work being done. Behavioral control can be broken down into a few more distinct categories:

  • Type of instructions – This can include telling the employee where to work, when to do the work and how the work should be done.
  • Instruction complexity – The higher the complexity of the instructions given, the more likely it is the individual is an employee. When the instructions have less detail, this gives the worker more control to do the job how they see fit, which points towards the worker being an independent contractor.
  • Evaluation – How a business evaluates the work can help determine if the worker is an employee or contractor. If the details of how the work was done are evaluated, then the worker is likely an employee. However, if only the end product is being evaluated, it’s more likely you have a contractor.
  • Training – This one is fairly simple. Would you like someone else telling you how to do your job? If a worker is an employee, the business has the authority to do just that. For independent contractors, they are the experts and generally don’t require training from the hiring company.

Control over Finances

This category looks at what control the business has over the financial and business pieces of the worker’s job. Factors to consider include:

  • Equipment investment – Independent contractors are much more likely than employees to make significant investments in the equipment they are using to get the job done. Employees are often provided equipment from their employer, rather than investing in it on their own.
  • Expense reimbursement – Businesses generally reimburse expenses for their employees, not for independent contractors.
  • Availability – Independent contractors generally have the freedom to seek out more business opportunities, while employees work is usually contained to the one business.
  • Payment – This one is easy to understand. When you have employees, you usually guarantee them a regular wage. With independent contractors, a flat fee is usually agreed upon and paid on the completion of the work.

Relationship Elements

What the business or worker offers in the relationship can also determine classification. Some key elements to consider are:

  • Contracts – Written contracts which describe the relationship the parties plan to create are a fairly simple way to determine which type of worker the business has. However, it’s important to note that a contract stating the worker is a contractor or an employee isn’t enough on its own to classify the worker’s status.
  • Benefits – Insurance, retirement, vacation and sick pay are benefits provided to employees. It’s rare for these benefits to be given to independent contractors.
  • Forever or just a fling – The length of time of the relationship can help determine a worker’s status. When an employee is hired, the expectation is that the relationship is long term. For contractors, the relationship isn’t permanent. Instead, both parties enter the relationship with the assumption of a certain amount of time for the work to be completed.

When businesses wrongly classify their workers, they are still liable for the related taxes and payments for those workers, and may even face other sanctions. Correctly classifying your workers helps you avoid this, making it easier for you to run your business.

We know this stuff can be kind of confusing – and even scary. But don’t fear! We are here to help.. just ask!

 

Updates to Per Diem Rates

Back in August, the General Services Administration (a.k.a GSA) issued its annual update on federal maximum per diem rates. These new rates pertain to locations within the continental United States – otherwise known as CONUS. This includes the lower 48.

Before we go into detail on the new rates, let’s do a little refresher.

Per Diem: A Latin word that translates to per day, or for each day. In the case of this post, per diem is being discussed as the daily allowance employees are paid and reimbursed for when they travel for work. Common expenses covered under per diem rates include:

  • Lodging
  • Meals
  • Tips
  • Ground Transportation
  • Wi-Fi Charges
  • Other incidental expenses, such as dry cleaning

Another simple way to put it: it is the amount of money an employee is able to spend, per day, on a business trip, attending conferences and events related to work and traveling to work away from the home office. Think of it as an allowance. However, it is important to note the per diem rate doesn’t include the cost of transportation to the site, such as flights or driving. Those costs are usually paid separately by the employers.

So, let’s get back to the main point: these rates are changing, and if you or your employees travel for work, it’s important to know them and stay in compliance!

The new FY18 rates apply to work travel on or after October 1, 2017. If the per diem allowance given to an employee is equal to or less than the federal rates, the allowance is excludable from income tax; those over the federal rates are subject to employment taxes.

Let’s take a look at what FY18 per diem rates have to offer.

The first takeaway to note is the CONUS meal and incidental expense (M&IE) rate hasn’t changed – it is staying at $51. The M&IE rates for non-standard areas – areas still within CONUS which have different rates for travel – will also stay the same. However, all locations in CONUS that don’t appear on the non-standard area list will have an increase in the lodging per diem rate. This has gone up from $91 to $93.

There are also some changes to the non-standard areas list. While no new locations were added, there were 14 locations removed for FY18. They include:

  • Redding, CA
  • Cedar Rapids, IA
  • Bonner’s Ferry/Sandpoint, ID
  • Dickinson/Beulah, ND
  • Watertown, NY
  • Youngstown, OH
  • Enid, OK
  • Mechanicsberg, PA
  • Scranton, PA
  • Laredo, TX
  • McAllen, TX
  • Pearsall, TX
  • San Angelo, TX
  • Gillette, WY

These removed locations are now considered part of the regular CONUS, and follow CONUS standard rates.

You might also be wondering about rates in places that aren’t part of the CONUS, such as Alaska, Hawaii or even Puerto Rico. If your employees are lucky enough to travel to Hawaii for work, it’s important to note these rates are not updated annually, but rather on an irregular basis.

The Department of State steps in and updates per diem rates for foreign travel, but also on an irregular schedule.

To find these rates, as well as the CONUS rates, be sure to check out the GSA website.

In the meantime, if you’re struggling to understand how much to reimburse your employees for their travels, reach out to us. We would be happy to help!

Tax Changes: What’s New?

Surprise – we’re back! We disappeared for a while, but we’re back to share some important updates on, you guessed it, taxes!

It should come as no surprise there are constant changes in the tax world, and staying up to date on all these changes and regulations can be taxing (don’t worry, we haven’t lost our sense of humor).

So, what’s been changing? We’re glad you asked.

Physical Nexus

A while back we brought you info on nexus (you can check it out here if you need a refresher). States are now looking to overturn the physical nexus requirement for sales tax and replace the current presence test with a new test which would be based on sales or transaction volumes. These changes are important to pay attention to, as they just might have an effect on your nexus and filing duties.

Sales Tax Reporting

Changes are happening to sales tax reporting in Colorado, which is important if you do business in the state. Back in July, reporting requirements began for sellers who don’t currently collect Colorado sales tax and have annual sales greater than $100,000. If the seller doesn’t let the buyer know on the invoice they need to pay use tax, the seller will be penalized.

Penalties are also being imposed on those who fail to provide their buyers with a year-end transaction summary – if the customer makes more than $500 in purchases. Customer information also must be provided to the state.

Other states such as Kentucky, Louisiana, Vermont and Washington have put similar requirements in place, and it’s likely others will follow. It’s important to pay attention to these changes – your state could be next!

Economic Standard

As if changing the sales tax reporting requirements wasn’t enough, states are also imposing an economic standard for any business conducted in a state that leads to an income tax requirement. The standard for “doing business” generally looks like:

  • $50,000 in property or payroll in a state
  • $500,000 of sales into a state
  • An amount of activity in the above categories that is more than 25% of the company’s total

Of course, these minimum amounts of sales, payroll and property can vary by state. The following states currently have similar definitions for doing business:

  • Alabama
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Michigan
  • New York
  • Ohio
  • Tennessee
  • Virginia
  • Washington

The Market-Based Method

Businesses who don’t sell tangible property have been using the “cost of performance” method of revenue sourcing for quite some time. However, states are now starting to source this kind of revenue using a market-based method.

Unsure of what a market-based method is? This method means the sale is attributed to the actual location of the customer, rather than where the work was performed. This change has been adopted by many states, with a lot more likely to play copycat. Stay aware of these changes – filing requirements and taxes may be due in states where taxpayers haven’t previously filed.

This is great info, but why should I care?

Understanding these issues and changes can help you prevent costly surprises. Simply filing in a state where a company has a physical location is no longer valid, and is even considered an invalid excuse for failing to handle sales and income taxes.

Taxes are important. To learn more, or ask some questions, reach out. We’re here to help you!

A version of this blog first appeared on eidebailly.com

Meet the Team: Sandy Kundert

124What is my role? My role is to ensure our clients are getting the best possible Eide Bailly experience they can. I do this by making sure we understand what our clients need, what they wish for and suggesting things they may not have thought of. Then we try to match a member of our team with the client. If our clients are successful, then we are successful!

Why are numbers important for business? Numbers are like lab test results from the doctor. They not only show us the current health of the business but aid in what we need to do in order to improve over time. Good decisions come from being informed and numbers do just that.

Why do I want you to succeed? I have several clients I have worked with for many years. You get to know each other on a personal level and they become like family. I always feel a little pride when my clients have a win, no matter how big or small and I’m thankful they let me be a part of that.

#ILoveSmallBiz – Whether a small business succeeds or fails, it has a huge impact on their employees, customers, and the local economy. By helping small businesses succeed, we all become winners.

Benchmarking: Part 3

You might have noticed, but we really want to see your business succeed from information gained through benchmarking. In other words, we want you to be a pro. But, before we unleash you to get started, we need to share a few things to avoid when you start a benchmarking analysis.

  • Comparing Company A to Company B: Make sure the peer group that you’re comparing to the business is representative of the industry. Comparing yourself to another, single company, can prevent you from seeing a true comparison if there are considerable differences. If you are looking at a benchmark analysis that restricts the sample size to only one other company, be critical in your findings.
  • Be aware that the benchmark analysis doesn’t end with a variance report: Once your report reaches the variances between its financial metrics and its peer group benchmarks, you might think you’re finished, but the work is just beginning. Don’t get worried — as the work is just beginning, so are the opportunities! When viewing the variances of your report you are now given potential problem areas to fix and also the opportunity to improve the overall performance of the company. For example, the variance report shows the areas of the business that are excelling. Now that you can see the areas of your company that have successes, see if this strategy can be implemented in other areas of the company.
  • Assume that numbers and performance are always changing: Positions in a car race are constantly shifting: first to third, second to last and so on. It isn’t optimal to compare your business to its peers only once per year, since many industries are always changing, even if your business isn’t. By preforming frequent benchmark analyses, your business can identify trends and react sooner.
  • Be mindful with calculations and the conclusions drawn from them: Certain benchmarks are common financial measurements (turnover rations, net profit margin, and liquidity rations) and their calculations generally do not change. If your benchmark analysis is expanded to include industry specific key performance indicators (KPIs) (airline-sales per seat, for example), make sure to use the same calculations, period after period. However, if a subaccount is added for one period but then removed the next period, the trend analysis performed might be misleading.
    • All members of management and the financial team need to understand the definitions of the metrics, and have a copy of them as well. You want to make sure there is only one interpretation, which will help defuse any confusion. Be sure everyone is on the same page to allow for complete and easy understanding.

It may not seem like a must do task, but benchmarking is important. When it comes down to it, remember the true purpose of benchmarking: to illuminate successes and challenges for your company, and to give you, the business owner, insights to inspire action!

*Shameless plug: If benchmarking sounds like the thing for you, let us know. We love helping businesses see how they’re doing!