The Sales Tax Cap

It’s time for a facelift. Last summer, we posted a blog about the North Dakota sales tax cap, and to this date, we still get tons of views on it. What does this mean? It’s a hot topic that’s important to business owners! So, we decided to bring it front and center again so you can get all the info you need without having to dig too far (we’re nice like that).

If you’re doing business in the state of North Dakota, there’s some important tax issues you need to know about: local sales tax cap and minimum tax.

There are multiple cities and counties in North Dakota, which means there are multiple local sales tax jurisdictions that have a max amount of sales tax you are responsible to pay – or, in other words, the refund cap. However, it’s not the vendor’s responsibility to cap the sales tax on your purchase.

The good news? You can submit a claim for a refund with the State!

So, how does all this cap stuff even work? Let’s look at an example:

Gary is working on a project, and bought $10,000 worth of lumber. He had the lumber delivered right to the job site – which is located in Fargo. He received a bill from the vendor, with the total being $10,750. This included sales tax at a rate of 7.5%, which was properly imposed.

Material Cost    $10,000.00

            Sales Tax                 750.00     

            Total                 $10,750.00

Gary went ahead and paid the bill for $10,750. However, in this case, the sales tax on the purchase is in excess of the maximum tax. This means Gary should apply for a refund. But how is the sales tax more?

Well…

The Fargo sales tax rate – which is the 7.5% that was applied to the purchase – is made up of three components:

State of North Dakota   5.0%

            City of Fargo                2.0%

            Cass County                  0.5%

The maximum tax for the City of Fargo is $50, while $12.50 is the maximum tax for Cass County (the State itself doesn’t have a maximum tax). In other words, the sales tax only applies to the first $2,500 of your purchase. Let’s recalculate Gary’s bill using the tax cap:

Material Cost    $10,000.00   

            Sales Tax               562.50

            Total                 $10,562.50

Confused about where the $562.50 came from? State tax = $500 ($10,000*5.0%), City tax = $50 ($2,500*2.0%), and County tax = $12.50 ($2,500*0.5%).

This means that our good friend Gary is eligible for a refund of $187.50 from the State of North Dakota – and who doesn’t love getting money back?

So how does Gary go about getting his refund?

Easy as cake (which Gary could definitely indulge in with his refund money)!

  1. Visit https://www.nd.gov/tax/salesanduse/forms/
  2. Under “Other Forms” click on “Claim for Refund Local Sales and Use Tax Paid Beyond Maximum Tax
  3. Follow the instructions to complete and send back

A few other things to keep in mind with maximum tax include:

  • The refund claim must be postmarked no later than three years from the date of the invoice. (This means if you weren’t aware of the cap, you can look back three years and see if you have any claims to submit!)
  • You need to include with the form a copy of all invoices covered by the claim.
  • The refund claim only applies on properly imposed sales tax – which means the sales tax needs to be right in order to claim a refund from the state.
  • The refund claim applies to a single transaction, not an item on a transaction or total purchases for a month.
  • Not all cities and counties impose a maximum tax. The claim for refund form has a table which outlines the cities and counties that impose this tax.

If you still have questions, let us know. We have tax people who can help make taxes a little less… taxing.

Kickstarter and Its Tax Implications

Need funding to get your idea off the ground? Turning your idea into a Kickstarter project just might be the ticket to getting the funding you need. Just don’t forget about the tax implications of using a fundraising platform such as Kickstarter.

Income Tax

Generally speaking, the funds received through a fundraising platform are reportable as revenue for income tax purposes. That makes sense, right? You’re getting money and most money is taxable.

Sales + Use Tax

If you’re thinking about offering a gift for a contribution (maybe it is the product you are trying to fund), you might create a sales or use tax obligation.

Can’t remember what the difference between sales and use tax is? Click here to find out.

While sales tax typically applies to the sale of goods or select services, use tax typically applies to gifts. So if you’re offering a gift, you may need to pay use tax to the appropriate state. The use tax is generally calculated based on the cost to produce the product, not the retail price.

What’s with typically and generally? Remember, your responsibility to remit sales and use tax depends on whether or not you have created nexus. Doesn’t ring a bell? Click here to find out more.

Let’s take a look at an example. Suppose you live in North Dakota and are doing a Kickstarter project for a new granola bar. Individuals contributing $50 to your project will receive five granola bars, because you’re nice like that. You will be selling the granola bars for $4/bar (retail), however, they cost you $2 to produce. When you gift the granola bars (meaning you take them out of your inventory at $2/bar), you are on the hook to pay use tax to the State of North Dakota in the amount of $2 times the applicable use tax rate.

What if the individual contributing is in Iowa? North Dakota tax still applies.

The Bottom Line

Taxes aren’t easy. If you are thinking about starting a Kickstarter project (or another similar fundraising platform), consider speaking to your tax professionals before you start your project. And remember, you might need both an income tax expert and state and local tax (SALT) expert in your corner. If you don’t have them, we’ve got them and they love this stuff.

 

 

State and local tax issues when buying or selling a business

You’ve always dreamed of owning a business. Now you’ve found the perfect one to purchase. You ask all the questions you can think of, come to an agreement on price and now you’re ready to go, right?

One major thing that sometimes gets overlooked is something called “successor liability.” This is the idea that when you buy a business, or the assets of a business, you generally also inherit all the liabilities associated with that business or the assets.

Some of these liabilities are pretty easy to figure out, but others may be hidden and difficult to know about or quantify. For instance, you can be audited for periods before your ownership and you can be assessed for sales or other taxes owed by the last owner.

Don’t believe us? Here are some common examples of successor liability discovered after the purchase of a business:

So what are some issues that could create tax exposures for you and your new company?

  • Company had the duty to file but failed to do so
  • The return was filed, but tax was not remitted
  • Company failed to pay use tax
  • Company did not have all the correct exemption certificates
  • Local taxes were ignored

So what can you do to reduce your risk when purchasing a business? Perform the proper due diligence. Due diligence can take a number of different forms, but generally includes reviews of the following:

  • Is the seller filing in the states where it has a duty to?
  • Are the returns accurately and timely?
  • Are taxability decisions correct?
  • Is the proper tax rate being applied?
  • Are exemption certificates accurate and up-to-date?
  • Has the seller been audited or received inquiries from any state?

Hiring a professional to assist you with a due diligence study can help you properly assess the potential liabilities and arrive at a more informed decision. Plus, it will hopefully save you some headaches later on.

But due diligence doesn’t just apply to buying a business. Let’s say you’ve finally made it to retirement and want to sell your business. Performing a due diligence study can help you be sure you have handled all these tax issues correctly and nothing will pop up unexpectedly that may scare away a potential buyer.

No matter what side you’re on, a little additional work upfront could potentially prevent some difficult, timely and expensive mistakes later.