Tips for Form W-2

As tax season rolls around, it’s important to have all your information ready. Not only will you feel more organized, but you’ll be able to provide your employees with all the information they need to file their own personal taxes.

One of the key pieces you’ll need to have for each of your employees is Form W-2.

What is it?

It’s an information form used to report federal and state taxable wages, taxes withheld, and other fringe benefit information to your employees. Information on this form is used by both the taxpayer (that’s your employees) in preparing to file taxes and the IRS to match records to the taxpayer’s tax return.

Do all my employees get one of these?

An employer legally must send out W-2 forms to each of its employees to whom they pay a salary, wage or other form of compensation.

If you need a refresher on who is an employee, go here.

Form W-2 must be filled out if you did any of the following:

  • Withheld any income, Social Security or Medicare tax from wages. This is regardless of the amount of wages.
  • Paid $600 or more in wages, even if you did not withhold any income, Social Security or Medicare tax.
    • Before you get too excited, this only applies to certain classes of employees, such as election workers or foreign ag workers.
  • Would have had to withhold income tax if the employee had claimed no more than one withholding allowance or had not claimed exemptions from withholding on Form W-4.

What do I need to do on the forms?

Form W-2 is made up of multiple parts, all of which is necessary for the taxpayer and the IRS.

Box 1 – Wages, tips and other compensation

This box is for the total taxable wages, tips and other compensation you paid your employee during the course of the calendar year. It includes the following:

  • Total wages
  • Bonuses (including sign-on bonuses) and awards
  • Total noncash payments, including certain fringe benefits
  • Tips reported by the employee to the employer
  • Certain employee business expense reimbursements
  • The cost of accident and health insurance premiums paid on the behalf of a S corp 2% shareholder
  • Taxable benefits from a section 125 plan if the employee chooses cash
  • Employee contributions to an Archer MSA
  • Employer contributions to an Archer MSA (if includible in the income of the employee)
  • Employer contributions for qualified long-term care services (if the coverage is provided through a flexible spending or something similar)
  • Taxable cost of group-term life insurance above $50,000 (above $2,000 for dependents)
  • Payments for non-job related education expenses
  • Employee’s share of Social Security and Medicare taxes if you paid them on their behalf
  • Designated Roth contributions made under a section 401(k) plan, a section 403(b) salary reduction agreement, or a governmental section 457(b) plan.
  • Distributions to an employee or former employee from an NQDC plan (or a nongovernmental section 457(b) plan.
  • Amounts includible in income under section 457(f) because the amounts are no longer subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture.
  • Payments to statutory employees who are subject to social security and Medicare taxes but not subject to federal income tax withholding.
  • Cost of current insurance protection under a compensatory split-dollar life insurance arrangement.
  • Employee contributions to a health savings account (HSA).
  • Employer contributions to an HSA if includible in the income of the employee.
  • Amounts includible in income under an NQDC plan because of section 409A.
  • Payments made to former employees while they are on active duty in the Armed Forces or other uniformed services.
  • All other compensation, including certain scholarship and fellowship grants.

 

Box 2 – Federal income tax withheld

This one’s pretty self-explanatory. Here we’re talking all federal income tax withheld from an employee’s wages for the calendar year.

 

Box 3 – Social Security Wages

This is the total wages paid (before payroll deductions) that are subject to employee social security tax. This, however, does not include social security tips and allocated tips (you get to save that for Box 7).

Items subject to employee social security tax, and therefore should be included in Box 3 are:

  • Signing bonuses
  • Employee business expense reimbursements
  • Taxable cost of group-term life insurance over $50,000
  • Employee and non-excludable employer contributions to an MSA or HSA except those made through a cafeteria plan.
  • Employee contributions to a SIMPLE retirement account
  • Adoption benefits

As a note, the total of boxes 3 and 7 (Social Security Tips) can’t exceed $127,200, as this is the maximum social security wage base for 2017.

 

Box 4 – Social Security Tax Withheld

Here we’re looking for the total employee social security tax withheld, including social security tax on tips. As a reminder, only includes taxes withheld for 2017.

 

Box 5 – Medicare wages and tips

Similar to box 3, this is where you record the wages and tips that were subject to Medicare tax. Wages that are subject to this are the same as those listed in box 3. The only difference? There’s no wage base limit to Medicare tax.

 

Box 6 – Medicare tax withheld

Here’s where you put the total of the Medicare tax withheld for 2017, including any additional Medicare tax withheld (there is an additional Medicare tax of 0.9% on taxable wages that exceed $200,000 for an employee in a calendar year).

 

Box 7 – Social security tips

Separate from box 3, this is where you show the tips your employee reported to you. All tips need to be recorded here, even if you did not have enough employee funds to collect social security tax for the tips.

And remember, the maximum amount for boxes 3 and 7 (combined) cannot exceed $127,200.

But wait, there’s more …

  • Box 8 – Allocated tips: The tips allocated to your employees
  • Box 9 – Verification code: If you’re participating in the W-2 Verification Code Initiative, the verification code goes here.
  • Box 10 – Dependent care benefits: This is the box for total dependent care benefits paid or incurred by you for your employee. This includes fair market value of daycare provided by you.
  • Box 11 – Nonqualified plans: The purpose of this box is to determine if any of the amounts in boxes 1, 3 or 5 were earned in a prior year. The Social Security Administration uses this information to ensure they have paid the correct amount of social security earnings.
  • Box 12 – Codes: The purpose of this box is to report the amounts for various fringe benefits to the employee along with the code to denote what fringe benefit it pertains to. For instance, 401k contributions made by an employee would be reported with a code of D. The IRS has a list of all of the codes along with a description for each one in the General Instructions for Forms W-2 and W-3, which can be found on the IRS website.

 The moral of the story

These forms matter, as they’re used by your employees, the IRS, Social Security Administration, and the state and local government. It’s your legal responsibility as an employer to provide each of your employees with a W-2 that accurately reflects the above items.

Yes, these forms can be confusing and time consuming. But it’s important to ensure they’re done correctly. If you need help, ask your business advisor for guidance. Or, come see us. We’re here to help.

 

 

Gift Giving & Taxes

The holiday season is nearly here, and you might be starting to think about gift giving this year. If you’re planning on thanking your employees for their great work throughout the year with gifts, or maybe even a holiday party, there are a few tax rules you should keep in mind.

In general, all types of compensation are subject to income tax – unless excluded by the tax code.

De Minimis fringe benefits may allow employers to provide holiday gifts of property – not cash or cash equivalents – with a low fair market value, without the employee having to pay additional taxes on the gift. De Minimis (reminder found here) in simple terms refers to something too minor or small to be considered. In other words, it is something small enough it is not practical to track or administer the value and has little to no impact on the employees’ income.

The frequency and availability of these gifts can determine whether or not they are considered de minimis.  As a general rule, as long as all employees are receiving the same gifts, the frequency isn’t an issue.

Some items that do qualify as de minimis fringe benefits and gifts – and are therefore excludable from income tax – include:

  • Traditional holiday gifts with a low fair market value. This includes your turkeys, hams or any other small non-cash
  • Occasional cocktail parties – this means your company holiday party, employee picnics, etc.
  • Occasional sporting event or theater tickets.
  • Occasional coffee, donuts and snacks in the office.
  • Special occasion gifts, such as sympathy flowers.

Each of the above items include a time frame… occasionally. These small gifts are considered excludable as long as they are not being given on a regular or excessive basis.

Now that we know what is excludable, let’s take a look at what is considered taxable.

The larger the gift, the better the chance it is taxable compensation. For example, if you’re considering giving your employees season tickets to see their favorite football team, those tickets are considered taxable and must be reported as income.

Other examples of taxable gifts include:

  • Gifting your employee a weekend away at an employee-owned facility, such as a hunting cabin or timeshare.
  • Providing your employee a membership in a country club or a gym.
  • Allowing your employee to use a company vehicle for commuting or other personal use more than one day a month.

Some employers provide some of these benefits throughout the year, while others may give them for the holidays. If you’re planning on giving any of these gifts, make sure you include them as income!

You might have noticed we haven’t touched on a very common gift employers give for the holidays – gift cards, gift certificates and even cash.

When it comes to gift cards, certificates and cash, the rule is pretty straightforward: no matter how large or small the amount, it will always be taxable (with a few small exceptions of course). If you’re thinking of giving your employee a $5 Target gift card or even a $500 general use gift card, you guessed it – it must be reported!

The moral of the story? Pay attention to the value of your gifts to make sure you’re in compliance. If you want to give your employees great gifts but aren’t quite sure what you should be reporting, let us know. We are here to help you and your employees have a great holiday season!

Fringe Benefits: What You Need to Know

As an employer, you want to ensure your employees are happy and thriving in your business. From time to time, you may even reward them for a job well done. But before you give a reward that’s outside the scope of their pay rate, think twice.

Welcome to the world of fringe benefits.

What are fringe benefits?

Fringe benefits are any form of payment that is considered compensation beyond your employee’s normal pay rate. This could include property, services or cash.

Why do I need to think twice?

Often, fringe benefits are taxable to the employee. And if it’s taxable, you have to report it on the employee’s W-2.

Fringe benefits that are taxable include:

  • Vacations
  • Personal use of an employer-provided vehicle
  • Gym memberships
  • Bonuses
  • Moving expenses (those in excess of your qualified expenses)
  • Group term life insurance
  • Gift cards

This is by no means an exhaustive list, but it should at least get you thinking.

What else do I need to know?

When we talk about fringe benefits, we’re often talking about value. The IRS has a little rule called de minimis fringe benefit, otherwise known as “one for which, considering its value and the frequency with which it is provided, is so small as to make accounting for it unreasonable or impractical.”

In other words, when you talk about value in regard to de minimis fringe benefits, if the benefit is so small it makes reporting it impractical, you don’t have to worry about it. And before you ask, there’s no specific dollar amount given.

One thing to remember is that cash or cash-equivalent gifts are NEVER non-taxable. For example, gift cards have an easily ascertainable value and can be redeemed for merchandise or a cash equivalent. So they need to be reported as part of an employee’s wages.

If you give items that are not cash, you will more than likely utilize fair market value. For instance, say you have a drawing during your company holiday party and an employee wins a 60 inch TV. This would not be considered de minimis and would need to be included in their income so taxes could be withheld. In this instance you can easily ascertain the value of the TV.

In the above example, you utilize fair market value. However, there are items that don’t have an easily discernible value. In that case, look at what a willing buyer would pay for that particular item. If you need a little more help, the IRS lays out guidelines for the valuation of certain items, like the lease of an employer-provided vehicle. You can find more information on that here.

So what would be considered de minimis?

So what would be considered de minimis? An example would be giving each of your employees a T-shirt, turkey, or something similar in value. The key here is that it HAS to be something tangible (as a reminder, this doesn’t mean cash or anything with a value attached … even a $5 gift card counts).

The moral of the story?

Fringe benefits are a great way to reward your employees and help you stand out from your competition. However, you need to be careful that you’re actually reporting these benefits as part of your employee’s wages.

Taxable v. Nontaxable Income

Tax season will be here soon, which means your friendly numbers nerds are getting ready! From balance sheets to calculators and everything in between, this is a busy time of year with a lot of moving parts. Tax day, Tuesday, April 17th, will be here in just 162 days. It’s a good idea to think ahead.

When it comes to income, it’s a fairly safe bet to assume it will be taxed. For example, salaries, bonuses, interest and business income are almost always taxable. However, there are some exceptions when it comes to what is and isn’t taxable. This stuff is important to know – different types of income can greatly impact your tax strategies for the upcoming year.

Everyone earns income in some shape or form, and knowing when you should and shouldn’t be paying tax is a must. As a business owner, it’s also important to realize what your employees may need to report on their tax filings, and how this might impact your business’ tax strategy.

To help you with your tax planning, we’re here to help break down which forms of income may be taxable.

The following types of income are taxable, and need to be reported properly:

  • Benefits from unemployment
  • Punitive damages
  • Income from bartering, which is based on the fair market value of the product or service you receive
  • Disability insurance income – if your employer paid the premiums
  • Fringe benefits you receive for performance of your services – think wellness benefits, company car use, etc.
  • Rent payments you receive for personal property – if you are operating your rental activity as a business
  • Gambling winnings and cash prizes

However, not everything is taxable. Here are some of the nontaxable types of income:

  • Workers’ compensation benefits – unless they are part of your retirement package
  • Disability insurance income – if you paid the premiums
  • Compensatory damages for getting sick or being injured
  • Cash rebates from the dealer or manufacturer of a service or product
  • Excluded fringe benefits, such as health insurance, parking and employee discounts
  • Child support payments
  • Rent money if you rent out your primary or vacation home fewer than 15 days a year. This is important to note if you use popular vacation rental sites, such as Airbnb and HomeAway. Also, note that if you rent it out more than 14 days, the activity is taxable.
  • Gifts and inheritances – if your great-great uncle passes away and leaves you his massive stamp collection, lucky you – no income tax!

It’s important to keep in mind these lists don’t include every taxable and nontaxable type of income under the sun, and there are often rules and exceptions that may apply. If you get confused, or aren’t sure if you should really be reporting something, check in with us. We’re here to help.

A version of this post first appeared in Eide Bailly’s Year End Tax Planning Guide.

Introducing the 2017-18 Tax Planning Guide

Tax planning guideTaxes are important, especially as you’re running your business. Paying attention to tax laws, and planning in a timely fashion for taxes, can seriously help you in the long run. For instance, you can estimate your tax liability and even look for ways to reduce it. That’s why we created our annual tax planning guide.

The guide highlights all sorts of information related to tax planning and tax law. Topics include:

  • Executive compensation
  • Investing
  • Real Estate
  • Business Ownership
  • Charitable Giving
  • Family & Education
  • Retirement
  • Estate Planning
  • Tax Rates

To learn more, or download the guide, click here.

Change could be coming …

There’s a large possibility that tax laws could be seriously changing, thanks to a change in White House administration and Republicans maintaining a majority of Congress. But for now, following current tax laws is the way to go.

However, it’s important to know that change could come quickly and you need to be ready to respond. We encourage you to have a tax adviser who can help you navigate these changes if they happen.

A Millennial’s View

Guest blog by: Isaac Bumgarden, audit intern, Eide Bailly LLP

Accountant: the career that seems like it’s filled with numbers nerds, gloomy days reading over spreadsheets and days spent typing away on a calculator. If we’re talking about a public accountant, everyone thinks you’re an evil number cruncher who’s up to no good (and maybe even works for the IRS).

So how does someone, let alone a millennial, decide accounting is the right career path?

As you know, everyone is different (yes, even us millennials have different tastes and interests). While I don’t speak for everyone, it seems a majority of millennials have a similar experience when it comes to choosing a career, especially if they landed on accounting. When looking at the accounting profession (at least before having much exposure to it), we tend to think of someone sitting behind a desk, quickly punching numbers into a calculator all day, or even someone working for the IRS – and often times, these views don’t seem to sit well with us millennials. After all, we are said to be a social generation which thrives off of each other.

However, college and schooling comes around, and a whole new world presents itself. Rather than hearing about the IRS auditors, you start learning about different options in the accounting world.

“A CFO? What’s that?”

            “There are other auditors besides the IRS? Well what’s the difference?”

           “I can open up my own tax accounting firm in my small home town if I                           understand this stuff?”

You begin to realize that maybe accounting isn’t a one-size-fits-all career path, and there might even be something about it that catches your eye. In fact, I see accounting as a door that leads to a lot of potential in the business world, which is something I never would have even thought of on my own.

Many of the potential scenarios in accounting appeal to us millennials if we are exposed to these options. If you enjoy being alone, maybe the traditional accounting job is for you. If you like interacting with people, take a look at the business side of accounting, such as being a CFO, where you get to go in and work alongside different companies. If travel is your idea of an ideal career, maybe an auditor is the right choice for you. There are many different opportunities and possibilities for each personality and skill set.

For myself (and other millennials, too) and even the general public, accounting is often seen as a boring profession, as explained before. However, accounting is so much more than just the numbers. Public accounting is not only a way to help individuals, but businesses as well.

Being an auditor allows you to help businesses be sure they are on the right track both legally and financially. If you’re the tax man (or woman), you can make sure individuals, families and businesses are being taxed properly, which can lead to saved money and greater revenue and income. Many people don’t realize accounting truly allows you to help people do what they love.

It seems the reason millennials aren’t choosing accounting as readily as other generations simply stems from the lack of information about what accounting really entails. When it comes to accounting, you’re never really stuck in one area. We millennials enjoy variety and a change in scenery, and accounting allows us to have just that.

Have Questions? We have Answers

In our line of work, we get a lot of questions on anything and everything related to owning and operating a business (and we’re happy to answer them, too)! While a lot of these questions are usually pretty easy to answer, sometimes we get a few that really make us think. Even then, we enjoy researching and finding the answers to help business owners be successful.

So, what questions do you have about your business? We would love to help you reach your dreams and goals.

In case you think your question might be too far out there, we promise it’s not. Check out some of these questions (and our answers) to get you started on finding the information you need to watch your business succeed.

“I have invoices coming out of my ears! What do I do with all of them?”

When you have a large amount of invoices to deal with, it’s easy to get overwhelmed and lose track of what needs to get done. When invoices aren’t being properly managed, your business can see some serious negative side effects, such as fraud. Following this list of tasks can help you make sure you’re keeping everything in check. Looking to an automated system, such as QuickBooks, is also a great way to keep your invoices at a manageable level.

“Where in the world did all of my cash go?”

This question is more common than you may think. While your business may be profitable, you can still be running out of cash, which might be a concern. Financial struggles can be hard, but our professionals are available to help. Check out this blog – and then, let’s talk!

“Why don’t I have enough time to do everything that needs to get done?”

We get it: owning and operating a business means you have a lot on your plate. From accounting and finance, to human resources to the day-to-day operations, you probably don’t have enough time to do it all yourself. The good news is you don’t have to! Consider your team of employees. What can you delegate to take some of the burden off your shoulders and free up some time? Another option is outsourcing. When you outsource some of your business activities, such as your accounting processes, you free up time to focus on why you got into business in the first place.

“What is this accrual accounting thing I hear so much about? Am I doing it?”

Knowing the specific ins and outs of accounting can be a confusing, daunting task. What it comes to what method of accounting you are using, the water may get even muddier. Maybe you’ve heard of cash based accounting and accrual accounting, but you really have no idea where to begin. We’ve written multiple blogs on how to tell the difference and how to select what fits your business and set up your books. Check them out!

“Taxes terrify me. Where do I even begin?”

Taxes are a complex issue, and questions regarding this topic are common. Whether you want to know more about R&D tax credits, employer vehicles and mileage, how to track your taxes or even all those pesky (yet necessary) forms, we’ve got you covered. Check out our tax archive for answers to all your most pressing questions. If you can’t find the answer, let us know.

Remember, although we numbers nerds really like our financial lingo, we promise to answer your questions in a way you will understand, not just a bunch of accountant talk. After all, we want to see your business succeed!