Forms, forms and more forms

There are many forms to remember as part of owning a business. There are forms to document employee wages, forms for contractors, forms for donated vehicles, forms for acquisitions … the list goes on and on.

Understanding what each form is, and which ones you need to fill out, is an important aspect of your business. Today we’re breaking down some of the most common information return forms and what gets reported on them.

First we’ll start with a definition. An information return is a tax document businesses use to let the IRS know about transactions. These forms are mandatory, meaning you don’t get a choice in filling them out and reporting your transactions to the IRS.

Now on to the forms …

 

Form W-2

The W-2 is also known as the wage and tax statement. It should be pretty familiar as it is used to document wages, tips and other compensation, Medicare, Social Security, income tax withholdings and more for each of your employees.

Every employer in a trade or business with employees who are compensated for their work needs to fill out the Form W-2 for them. If income, social security or Medicare tax was withheld, you get to fill out this form for your employees.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31, for federal and most states
  • To IRS: January 31both e-file and paper copies

 

Form W-2G

Form W-2G is a specific form used for gambling winnings and losses. You will need to file a W-2G if you receive:

  • $600 or more in gambling winnings (if the payout is at least 300 times the amount of the wager)
  • $1,200 or more in winnings from bingo or slot machines
  • $1,500 or more from keno
  • More than $5,000 from a poker tournament

As a friendly reminder, all gambling winnings are subject to income tax.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099 Series

The Form 1099 series is a group of forms used to report ordinary kinds of payments, such as dividends, interest, retirement distributions and miscellaneous income payments.

Form 1099-MISC

Form 1099-MISC is filed by a business for payments made to nonemployees who do work for your business or trade. In other words, if they’re not an employee, but you’re paying them for a service, you have to report it on Form 1099-MISC.

Form 1099-MISC is required for each person you’ve made payments to based on the following criteria:

  • $10 or more in royalties or broker payments in lieu of dividends or tax-exempt interest
  • $600 or more in rents, services, prizes and awards, other income payments, medical and health care payments, crop insurance proceeds, cash payments for fish you purchase or cash paid from notional principal contract to an individual, partnership or estate
  • Any fish boat proceeds
  • Gross proceeds to an attorney
  • Direct sales of at least $5,000 of consumer products to a buyer for resale anywhere other than a permanent retail establishment
  • Any backup withholding regardless of the amount

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31, for federal and most states
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically) or January 31 (if any payments for nonemployee compensation are reported in box 7)

 

Form 1099-DIV

This form is used for dividends and distributions. Specifically it’s filed for each person for whom you’ve:

  • Paid dividends and other distributions on stock of $10 or more
  • Withheld or paid any foreign tax on dividends and other distributions of stock
  • Withheld any federal income tax under the backup withholding rules
  • Paid $600 or more as part of a liquidation

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-INT

The Interest Income form is used for reporting interest payments when:

  • Interest of $10 or more is paid or credited on earnings
  • Interest of $600 or more from other sources in the course of trade or business
  • Forfeited interest due to premature withdrawals of time deposits
  • Federal backup withholding and foreign tax withholding and paid on interest
  • Payments of any interest to bearers of certificates of deposit

This form is specifically for interest payments made in the course of your trade or business, including federal, state and local government agencies.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-OID

Form 1099-OID is also known as the Original Issue Discount. It’s used when you purchase a bond for lesser price than the face value or principle amount. This discount is given instead of a bond earning interest. If you purchase a bond for less the face value, you should receive a Form 1099-OID, which is where you report $10 or more in gross income from that bond.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-R

This form is used to report any distribution of $10 or more form pension sharing or retirement plans, any individual retirement arrangements, annuities, pensions, insurance contracts, etc. It’s also used to report death benefit payments made by you as the employer that are not part of a pension, profit-sharing or retirement plan.

The fun part about Form 1099-R is that there are nine numeric codes and 18 alpha codes to use when reporting amounts in box 7 of the form. For more information on these, and what to put in what box, check out our W2/1099 ebook.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-PATR

This form is specific to cooperatives and must be filled out if $10 or more in distributions paid from the cooperative is passed through to their patrons. This includes any domestic production activities deduction and certain pass-through credits.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-LTC

This form is used if you pay any long-term care benefits, including accelerated death benefits. Payers include insurance companies, governmental units and viatical settlement providers.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-SA

Here we’re looking at reporting distributions made from an HSA, Archer MSA or Medicare Advantage MSA. Form 1099-SA can be used if the distribution is paid directly to a medical service provider or to the account holder. A separate return has to be filed for each plan type.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-A

Also known as the Acquisition or Abandonment of Secured Property, Form 1099-A is used for each borrower you lend money to in connection with your trade or business. Specifically, this applies to the full or partial satisfaction of a debt.

Deadline:

  • To borrower: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-C

Use this form for each debtor for whom debt of $600 or more was cancelled. Specifically, you must file Form 1099-C if:

  • You are a financial institution
  • A credit union
  • A corporation that is a subsidiary of a financial institution or credit union
  • A federal government agency
  • An organization whose significant trade or business is the lending of money

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-B

Form 1099-B is specifically for a broker or barter exchange. It must be filled out for each person for whom the broker:

  • Sold stocks, bonds commodities, regulated future contracts, foreign currency contracts, debt instruments, etc. for cash
  • Received cash, stock or other property from a corporation that the broker knows had stock acquired in an acquisition
  • Exchanged property or services through a barter exchange

Deadline:

  • To recipient: February 15
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-K

This one is specific to a payment settlement entity (PSE) for payments made in settlement of reportable payment transactions within the calendar year.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1099-Q

Form 1099-Q is used for payments from qualified education programs. Specifically, you must file this form if you’re an officer or employee having control of a program established by an eligible educational institution and have made a distribution from a qualified tuition program.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: January 31
  • To IRS: February 28 or March 31 (if filing electronically)

 

Form 1042-S

This form is used to report income subject to withholding paid to nonresident aliens, foreign partnerships, foreign corporations or nonresident alien or foreign fiduciaries of estates or trusts.

Deadline:

  • To recipient: March 15
  • To IRS: March 15

 

The moral of the story

This is a high level overview of just some of the information returns that exist. It’s important to understand what forms apply to your organization and what information to report on each form. To learn more, check out our W2/1099 year end planning book or contact your business advisor.

 

 

Tips for Year-End and a Smooth Audit Prep

By: Stephanie Berggren, Eide Bailly LLP

Year-end is always a hectic time. Your company is making sure that all required state and federal filings are done and internal documents are completed. Plus, to make things even crazier, you’re also starting to think about and prepare for your annual audit. Can you say overwhelming?

One question that is fairly common: How early is too early to start on year-end procedures? The answer? There’s no such thing as too early. We are in a world where activity happens every day that will affect your year-end and your audit, so paying attention and staying up to date is important.

So what does year-end preparation look like?

To get started, at a minimum, you should have a review process that documents when purchase orders are created, when bills are paid and when cash/checks are reviewed and deposited. This will help lay a solid foundation you can use to make sure you’re on the right track.

Monthly, you should be doing reconciliations for the following common accounts:

  • Bank accounts – this helps verify that all revenue and expenditure activity is captured in your records on a monthly basis.
  • Accounts receivable – this will help you make sure your customers are paying in a timely manner, and will also help with your collection procedures.
  • Accounts payable – this will help verify that amounts showing due are true payables and to make sure your vendors are getting paid timely. This may also help you take advantage of discounts given by your vendors for early payment.
  • Capital asset inventory – this will help establish that any capital outlays are added to your software and/or external schedule. This list is an audit necessity.
  • Payroll accounts (accruals and expenses) – this will help verify that payroll is being accounted for properly in the correct accounts.

Doing these tasks on a monthly basis establishes good review and control habits. It also gives you, or your accounting and finance team the ability to find and fix errors during the year – and before your auditors find them.

Now that we’ve reviewed what to do on a monthly basis, let’s discuss year-end. Annually, you should:

  • Review checks paid after year-end to make sure they are properly included in or excluded from your accounts payable ledger. This not only helps make sure your auditor isn’t finding any adjusting entries during their audit, but also helps ensure you have included all your expenses in the proper year.
  • Review old outstanding payables/credits to see if either payment was missed or if payments were misapplied.
  • Review your deposits received after year-end to make sure you applied payments to the correct customer and year.
  • Review old outstanding accounts receivable to see if an allowance is necessary for accounts that may not be collectible.
  • Update your capital asset listing for any disposals/deletions that have happened. This can be done by having each program/department/etc. do physical counts of their assets and submitting that to the finance department or selecting a lucky individual to verify the entire list.
  • Review year-end adjustments, usually prepaid, accruals, and current versus long term debt, which are required for the audit. This is the last part that has an impact on your findings if the auditor is the one posting these journal entries. Below are a list of accounts that are usually adjusted:
    • Prepaid rents, real estate taxes and insurance
    • Accrued payroll and taxes
    • Compensated absences
    • Long term debt (car and equipment loans)

Because you have accounted for your monthly procedures, your year-end procedures should become less burdensome since those issues were addressed throughout the year (and who doesn’t want an easier year-end?). With the confidence that your company gains from knowing you have reviewed and reconciled your financial information, you are able to concentrate on accurately and confidently preparing your financial statements.

Year-end work can be time consuming and sometimes tricky. If you need to save time or need help figuring out where to begin, let us know. Ours numbers nerds are no stranger to this type of work – and they even enjoy doing it!

 

Tracking Taxes

We all know we need to track our business transactions. However, there might be some tax considerations you weren’t thinking of…

Apportionment.

What? Apportionment is a fancy tax term describing the method you use to allocate your income (or loss) to a specific tax jurisdiction. Determining which states your income should be apportioned to goes back to the concept of nexus. O, man another fancy tax term…

We’ve already talked about the concept of nexus as it relates to sales and use tax on our blog. If you remember, nexus (a.k.a sufficient physical presence) creates the responsibility to pay tax in a state you are doing business. If you want to know more, click here.

Once you determine you have nexus in a state (and we are talking for income tax purposes), there are some considerations when it comes to tracking your assets, income and expenses. Here are a few of the common areas that need to be tracked by state:

  • Fixed Assets
  • Inventory
  • Payroll
  • Rent
  • Revenue

If any of those terms don’t sound familiar, our glossary might help.

Tracking these areas from the beginning is much more fun (only because we think accounting is fun) than going back through a year’s worth of financial data to figure it out.

Personal Mileage

Bottom-line, Uncle Sam only wants you taking a deduction for business miles (makes sense right?). Here are two points we think are important for you to consider:

  1. Track your mileage (personal, business + commuting (from home to the office and back)
  2. Personal mileage could be considered a taxable benefit (and should be reported as taxable wages)

Meals, Travel + Entertainment

Here’s the deal on meals, travel and entertainment…these are some of the most scrutinized expenses when it comes to Uncle Sam (that’s because the line is often blurred between personal and business in this area). When it comes to tracking these types of expenses, make sure you are keeping the supporting documentation (ex. receipt or invoice) to substantiate the business purpose of the expense.

Business Documents

We’re talking about your articles of incorporation, bylaws, member and operating agreements, etc. These documents are not only important when starting your business but also important throughout your business lifecycle; keep them where you can find them. In addition, keep copies of any correspondence with Uncle Sam (a.k.a IRS). And if you want to be really nice to your tax professional, share these documents and correspondence with them (keeping them in the loop can save you).

These are just some of the considerations from a tax perspective. Make sure you are staying connected to your business partners (i.e. your tax professional) throughout the year. Need one? We have plenty; let us know how we can help.

 

 

Taxes: Plan Ahead & Don’t Be Surprised

For many of you, the last quarter of the fiscal year-end is here. Have you talked to, or at least scheduled a meeting with, your tax professional yet?

If you haven’t, we recommend starting the conversation. What’s the point? If you expect to have taxable income, now is the perfect time to project what your taxable income might look like; giving yourself time to take action or prepare for the cash outlay to pay Uncle Sam.

Your tax professional can help you strategize legitimate ways to minimize your tax burden or help you avoid surprises on tax day.

Maybe you are a cash basis taxpayer and you can accelerate (or hold off – because it’s important to think about future tax years too!) paying your vendors.

 Maybe you are in the position to purchase fixed assets and take advantage of accelerated depreciation methods. Or again, maybe your strategy will be different based on expectations for future tax years.

 Maybe you have related party balances (we are talking transactions that aren’t at an arms-length … owner balances, related entity balances, etc.). Uncle Sam has special rules for those and you don’t want to be surprised.

 Maybe you are considering your retirement savings, deadlines for retirement plans often correlate to tax deadlines. Not sure about retirement savings options? Click here.

Whatever your situation, if you are expecting taxable income, consider talking to your tax professional. Don’t have one yet? We have hundreds of tax professionals who rock (and have access to national resources which is pretty awesome)!

Personal Use of Vehicle

We interrupt your day to bring you another article on taxes. In case you hadn’t guessed it, year-end is HUGE for tax planning (here are a few reasons why you need to be year-end prepping). There a number of criteria and factors that go into tax planning.

Personal Use of VehicleToday’s topic is personal use of vehicles. All employers who furnish vehicles to employees  are required to add the personal use value of the vehicle to their employee’s W-2. It’s important to understand this as it will affect not only your tax situation, but your employees’ individual tax liability.

Seem complicated? Don’t worry, we have a handy packet to help. Download our Personal Use of Auto packet to learn more. Here’s a sneak peek of what it includes:

  • Notice for employers who wish to have employer-provided vehicles available for personal commuting and minimal personal use (think lunch stop or personal errands on a business trip).
  • An alternate notice if you would rather have your employer-provided vehicles uses specifically for business only.
  • Employee notice, summarizing your position on employee-provided vehicles and responsibility for documentation (read: this is where you stand on use of vehicles and this is what you expect).
  • Explanations of various methods available to figure out personal use value of employer-provided vehicles.
  • A statement from employee to the employer regarding use of employer-provided vehicle (read: your employee understands your policy and signs this statement)
  • Worksheet (don’t you miss those from school) to calculate employee’s taxable income from employer provided vehicle.

There are several things to consider when prepping for tax season and vehicles are just one of them. Don’t feel overwhelmed. We’re always here to help if you need us.